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Improved mulberries

 
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David Goodman wrote:I must confess: I worked to grow strawberries in both Tennessee and Florida for a few years and then ditched them altogether. Once I discovered the productivity of improved mulberry varieties, I planted about a dozen of those and never looked back.

The advice in this thread is good, however. Runners will draw away the strength. You might also try fertilizing with fish emulsion. I have a Master Gardener friend who raises great strawberries with that as her main feed for them. My bet is the micronutrients do it.



What are the improved mulberry varieties you are using? I have tried planting several different fruit trees here in NW florida and most of them either died entirely or are barely making it, but the few mulberries I planted are thriving. Even the ones my goats stripped are doing well.  I have no idea the variety I planted though and would like to get more, might as well get some 'improved' varieties while I'm at it!  
 
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Miranda Converse wrote:

David Goodman wrote:I must confess: I worked to grow strawberries in both Tennessee and Florida for a few years and then ditched them altogether. Once I discovered the productivity of improved mulberry varieties, I planted about a dozen of those and never looked back.

The advice in this thread is good, however. Runners will draw away the strength. You might also try fertilizing with fish emulsion. I have a Master Gardener friend who raises great strawberries with that as her main feed for them. My bet is the micronutrients do it.



What are the improved mulberry varieties you are using? I have tried planting several different fruit trees here in NW florida and most of them either died entirely or are barely making it, but the few mulberries I planted are thriving. Even the ones my goats stripped are doing well.  I have no idea the variety I planted though and would like to get more, might as well get some 'improved' varieties while I'm at it!  



Chestnut Hill Tree Farm in Alachua county has a large-fruited black type (which they haven't named, apparently) that makes marvelous fruit. There's also a variety found in Gainesville by Craig Hepworth known as the "6th Street Mulberry". Great producer. I also planted a fat, white-fruited type I found in a car lot as well as an Illinois Everbearing that was a monster on production, provided late frosts didn't get the young blooms. I also got some nice long mulberries from Burnt Ridge Nursery that were doing well when I sold the property.

The worst ones I had were two trees from Gurney's sold as "black mulberry." They grew large but the fruit was small and the yields were only so-so.

There is also a Dwarf Everbearing variety that's all over the state now but the yields aren't really that impressive. Makes a good hedge, though. I have about six in my food forest as part of the shrub layer.
 
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