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equisetum arvense - Horsetail removal

 
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I work for a company and they are being asked to remove horsetail from a garden as its taking over. We are removing it from ponds and wet areas by hand and I am wondering does anyone know another way to reduce its prevalence? Can I shade it out with another pond plant? Does anything eat it?

I also plan to make some sprays with it but can think what else to do with it apart from that. So any other advice would be good.
 
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Good luck, that is one tough plant. It seems to be totally resistant to herbicides as it is often the only thing growing along train tracks where they spray heavily.
Why do they want to remove it?, it always seems so soft and harmless to me.
 
Henry Jabel
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Akiva Silver wrote:Good luck, that is one tough plant. It seems to be totally resistant to herbicides as it is often the only thing growing along train tracks where they spray heavily.
Why do they want to remove it?, it always seems so soft and harmless to me.



Because there is too much of it really which is a shame in some ways as it makes good habitat for various critters. Maybe bamboo would work in shading out around the edges of the pond and clumping bamboo rhizomes are pretty dense. Thanks for your input.
 
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