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Please help me identify this thing- type of Fungi?

 
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Hi everyone, new to this forum as a poster but have been reading for years

I thought this was an animals droppings at first, then a type of reptile egg, but on closer inspection looks like some type of fungi ball?

Can anyone help me identify it please? It was under my clothesline on the grass. I live in Sydney Australia if that helps the fungi experts.

Each of the balls are approximately 4-5mm diameter, all found together. It may be a coincidence but a freshly dead earthworm was nearby.

Thanks for your time.
IMG_4364.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_4364.jpg]
Small ball fungi?
 
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That's very interesting looking, but I have no idea.  I think some of the Facebook groups are focused on mushroom ID and you might get a lot more answers on one of those.  
This site has a lot of ideas about how to use fungi in permaculture and how to cultivate them.
John S
PDX OR
 
Trish McGill
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Thanks for that, I will do as you suggest. Another permaculture friend has suggested they are blue qondong seeds that have passed through a bird. Since bird sit on the clothesline they may have deposited them underneath. I have had some seasonal rainforest birds visiting the garden, so I'm keeping that suggestion as a possibility also. Thanks for the links.
 
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Trish, Welcome to Permies.

Your friend might be right.

They have a brain like nut:

"Fruit is produced after four years and is red or sometimes yellow, measuring 20 and 25 mm across. A 3 mm layer of flesh covers a brain-like nut with a hard shell that encases the seed. This fruit is referred to as a drupe, it ripens from green to a shiny red in late spring or summer, and is globe shaped and 20 – 40 mm across.[4][5] The skin of the fruit is waxy."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santalum_acuminatum
 
Trish McGill
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Thank you for the welcome Anne

That is some interesting information you've posted. Sounds convincing doesn't it–'brain like nut' especially.

I think I've had a bat visitor or one of the seasonal rainforest birds relieve themselves while sitting on the clothesline.

Not a nice thought, but I might get a free tree. Thanks again.

 
Bring me the box labeled "thinking cap" ... and then read this tiny ad:
HARDY FRUIT TREES FOR ORGANIC AND PERMACULTURE
https://permies.com/t/132540/HARDY-FRUIT-TREES-ORGANIC-PERMACULTURE
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