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RMH at 10,000 ft but not more than 12000ft

 
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I have not located anything on the forums that address or answers this question.

I have access, hopefully one day I will buy it, to a 30 x 60 shop on 10 acres at 10,200 ft. I am new to the RMH idea and knowledge. I am wondering if, and I haven't found anything to the contrary, these will work well at this high of an altitude?  Are there any that you know of that are working? Normal wood heating at these elevations will take roughly 10 cords of wood here in Colorado.

Thank you in advance for any and all comments. This sounds like an exciting site with lots of information. Reminds me of Mother Earth News in the early years.


Pitt
 
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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David, i know a batch can work at 5000ft elevation. I have one in my workshop.

I think there's a guy who did a J or two in the Himalaya, somewhere, but i don't know how high.

Best idea i have, bring materials for a temporary cooking rocket, at that altitude; few tin cans. And do a test.
 
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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My friend Russell has been installing rocket stoves here in Ladakh at 11,500 feet, and is starting a business to make and install them, along with some Ladakhi friends of mine.

Himalayan Rocket Stoves

We made a couple of rocket cookstoves at our school at 10,500 feet, and they worked but we didn't work out the design completely so we had problems with ash buildup and smokeback. But it seems they'll work if we do them right. Ours were J-type, I guess. Russell's are, too.
 
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Location: Kent County, MI
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David Pittenger wrote: I have not located anything on the forums that address or answers this question.

I have access, hopefully one day I will buy it, to a 30 x 60 shop on 10 acres at 10,200 ft. I am new to the RMH idea and knowledge. I am wondering if, and I haven't found anything to the contrary, these will work well at this high of an altitude?  Are there any that you know of that are working? Normal wood heating at these elevations will take roughly 10 cords of wood here in Colorado.

Thank you in advance for any and all comments. This sounds like an exciting site with lots of information. Reminds me of Mother Earth News in the early years.


Pitt



I see of no reason that it wouldn't work well there, just make sure to design for your specific conditions, and stick to a tried and tested model of the RMH to start with. I think one of the biggest design criteria would be to reduce wind "blowback" into the chimney by installing a wind guard or even a "vacu-suck" version of a wind guard. Also a cold air intake that opens up somewhere near the feed tube, so as to prevent the stove from sucking cold air through any cracks in the windows/doors.
 
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