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homemade snow sled  RSS feed

 
Ben Skiba
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Location: where the fox howls
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anybody else built a homemade sled before?homemade skis?Seems to be draggin more then sledin.sled designs a yankee jumper but i named her dragger.
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Travis Johnson
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I grew up in Maine, always lived here, and learned at a young age that sleds are always the answer. A sled does not need snow to work well, but naturally do slide better with ice or snow.

We grew up logging, and in the summer when our bulldozer could barely pull three logs out, in the winter we could load two dozen 16 foot logs on a logging sled and walk out of the woods effortlessly. I have built sleds for three different buildings, all slid over dry land. With this one building (shown) I was not sure if my little Kubota would pull it and my dad said, "oh sure it will", and it never spun a tire. Moving buildings is actually a lot easier then most people think it is, and incredibly cheap compared to building one. I plan to move a 24 x 48 building this winter, and yes I will cobble together a wooden sled to do that as well (but will use my bulldozer to pull it).

In the winter, and for personal needs; instead of toting a backpack while snowshoeing, I fashioned my own sled behind me. It is made out of a kids plastic sled, has a hinge screwed to the front, then the other end onto a 1/x3 board. I drilled a hole in the end of it and made a loop with rope. In this manner, it goes around my belt and so as I snowshoe it is towed behind me. Being small, it follows my tracks, and with my gear in a very low center of gravity, it seldom topples over. With the pole behind me and attached to my belt, I do not have to pull it twisted and with one hand, but instead it is hands free, yet going down hills, the pole keeps the sled from running into the backs of my legs or over my snowshoes.

A few years back I needed sand in the dead of winter to build my house with. Here in Maine towns mix salt with sand to make it go farther and being constantly dug into, it never freezes unlike my gravel pit. But my town put a gate 1/4 mile away from the pit to keep people out. No big deal, I just used two plastic sleds, (6) 5 gallon buckets, and loaded them up and slid them the 1/4 mile in and out along the ice covered road. 6 buckets of sand is heavy, but I could two two sleds with 3 buckets of sand apiece with little effort.

In fact for most of my moving needs, winter or summer, one of the first design ideas I turn to, is to see if I can somehow use a sled to accomplish what needs to be done.

This is a shed that belonged to my late grandmother. It is 13 x 18 feet and hauled across the road from her house to mine and used as a mudroom/office and now has a porch added to it. It has been a great addition to my house. Note the wooden sled built to pull it. You cannot see it, but it is built like a giant capital A in shape.

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Ben Skiba
Posts: 36
Location: where the fox howls
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Hey Travis thanks for the information,helped me out abit.I ended up using dimensional lumber to make this sled but it gets the job done.can hall firewood and what not.Also put a piece of tin on the front like a tobogan.
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