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What does lots of foxglove indicate?

 
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This stuff LOVES popping up all over my new garden beds and all over my property. The bees love it and I wonder if it has any other beneficial qualities, but regardless I'm usually pulling it out since I've got little ones and the stuff is really toxic. I was curious though, if all this foxglove indicates a nutrient imbalance, etc. Thanks!
 
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Found some info!

This study: https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/handle/1957/10869 mentioned that it's a pioneer plant, doing well in disturbed, "high productivity" soils, sprouting best with lots of nitrogen, but being less likely to become perenial when there's lots of nitrogen.

This document on Permaculture News: http://www.permaculturenews.org/resources_files/pdc_info/Plants_as_Soil_Indicators.pdf  says foxglove indicates low lime (so acidic and low calcium, right?)
 
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Pfaf says:

An infusion of the plant prolongs the life of cut flowers. Root crops growing near this plant store better[54]. An apple-green dye is obtained from the flowers[168]. Cut flower. Cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

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