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tyres under cabin to isolate from railway vibration?

 
Paul Ryan
Posts: 59
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hi everyone!

I'm going to build a wooden cabin on a site near a railway line (no choice about site). There is a little ground vibration when a train goes past. It's not terrible but I'd like to minimize the effect if possible.

So I am thinking about putting old tyres under the bearers that support the floor joists.

I was not intending to fill them with anything, just leave them as they are. The hope is that they will insulate the cabin frame from some of the vibration but still be firm enough to give a good solid foundation. They should also a good damp barrier.

Does anyone have experience of using tyres like this? If yes, I'd love to hear how it went for you ...

Thanks,
Paul
 
chip sanft
Posts: 354
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
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I haven't done or seen anything like what you're proposing. But if you end up trying it, I'd be sure to consult an engineering table about your joist dimensions, using as your length the measurement from solid base to solid base. Intermediate supports help reduce stress on the joist and if the support isn't solidly based, it won't provide that assist. So you'll need the longer and therefore larger dimension lumber.

I did live near a light rail line for a year. It surprised me how quickly what initially seemed like an intolerable racket faded to the point I'd have to think about it to notice it. But that effect might depend on how much use the line gets: once a day or something might be harder to get used to.
 
s. ayalp
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Location: istanbul - turkey
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Hi Paul. Yeah, base isolation is to go if you want to limit the vibrations. It creates a "soft" layer that deforms and absorbs the vibration energy. It is extensively used in seismic designs (especially in Japan) and vibration control for foundation design (like under heavy stationary machinery). How much it might help the specific problem, I don't know for sure. Base isolation may increase the initial cost up to 10-30%, so it usually not used for ordinary structures, like houses, apartments etc. It is also a "new" subject for seismic design ( or any design that puts a soft layer in between), so there is a lot to be done. I don't think there is a research going on about "light" structures under influence of rail road vibrations or any other vibration for that matter.
Here is a video link:

Tough we can always roll the dice
Things come to mind:
-One should separate the structure completely from the foundation. Structure should rest on "rubber" (elastomer bearing as it is called) and that to the foundation. But it does creates some problems. The basement slab that rests on bearings should be very stiff/rigid (2 m/6 ft thick basement slabs are quite common). For this case basement beams should be larger than regular, and have diagonals (like we do in vertical, between columns).
-Wooden cabin is way to light to withstand wind, moreover we are isolating the structure in this case. Usually structures are so heavy, they don't jump or tip over or similar. So there should be a safety mechanism to hold the structure if there is a vertical movement.
-Using tires is cost wise, but it is not common. So it will respond how? Another question here. Larger the tyre the better, but not that sure also.
I made some sketches just for , you know, brain storming. If you end up going for it, please consult some eng. with experience. Hope it helps!

Salim
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another option to limit veritcal movement
 
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