Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

paw paw trees-how to propagate

 
Posts: 15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a paw paw tree growing in the woods near my house, it is too big to move and does not get enough light to ripen fruit. I would like to take a cutting and start a new tree, How is this done and will it work on  a paw paw?
 
gardener
Posts: 6274
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1028
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
the pawpaw tree is difficult to raise from seed since the first two years it needs to be in mostly shade as the leaves are very prone to sunburn.

Cuttings need to be airlayered to have the best possible chance for survival and once freed from the parent tree it wouldn't be a bad idea to grow it out for a year or two in mostly shade.

In nature these are river bottom trees that grow up under tree canopies, they grow fairly fast once established and reach for the sunlight by growing tall with few branches below the canopy.
The seeds are designed to overwinter (stratify) and then they tend to take lots of moisture to begin the sprouting process.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 323
Location: Pittsburgh PA
17
duck forest garden fungi trees chicken woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is the tree also not flowering? Or not setting fruit? The bigger issue may be that paw paws are not self fertile, and many need a second variety. They are notoriously bad pollinaters even in ideal conditions. They are also pollinated by flies attracted to the terrible smelling flowers
 
pollinator
Posts: 207
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
30
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

chad Christopher wrote:The bigger issue may be that paw paws are not self fertile, and many need a second variety. They are notoriously bad pollinaters even in ideal conditions. They are also pollinated by flies attracted to the terrible smelling flowers



In Colonial days, the Quakers in my area used to hang a dead animal (think road kill) in their pawpaw trees to attract flies as pollinators.
 
j flynn
Posts: 15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks,the tree does flower and has good growth on half the tree, the other half is dead,so it may not be healthy enough to try propagating. And the coastal mass climate may not be to its liking. But I intend to try anyway.
 
This will take every ounce of my mental strength! All for a tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!