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Want to buy enormouse variety of old apple trees or seed for natuarl pastures.

 
rose macaskie
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 I have found an english on line nursery that sells a big varietty of apple trees, old english ones about 46, i think it is, cooking apple trees and not quite so many eating apples including ones from th etree that was in isaac newtons garden an nobbly apple and severral crab apples.
 The site is called habitat aid.help save native habitats and promote biodiversity in the UK.
He also has seed mixes and plugs i suppose plugs mats of plants that would establish pastures like the ones that used to be. with the sort of micture of garssand wild flowers that you get in spanish mountain pastures, scabiouse flowers, plaintain, and a whole lot of others.
   Maybe his miced seeds for sowing your self a feild of the old fashioned type full of flowers as well as grases and clvers would give you somethign close to what sepp holzer is able to seed on his new lands that he is starting off. THey sell big bags of seeed to sow, Sepp walks around slinging handfuls of seed around and i think, "how did he collect so much seed"?
     I have ordered some apple trees, an apple whose fruit ripens in august, usefull and one that tastes close to a cox orange pippin the most deliciouse apple in england, some cookers, apparently some varieteis of cookinng apple make a sauce that is booth sharp and sweet enough not to need sugar, Others are good for roasting, their skins dont split in the oven. I did not know there were so many points to consider when chosing a cooking apple and some damsons, the plums that make the best jam i know of.
    He offers plugs of plants for different soils one type of plug for one use and another for another, and mixed bags of trees for different situations like for clay ground,  light ground and  wet ground.   I imagine his site must be interesting for permiculturists. agri rose macaskie.
 
maikeru sumi-e
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Wish I was in the UK/Europe. I'll be buying 3 heirloom apple trees this year, including the elusive Cox's Orange Pippin, which I've been longing to try for years.

I'll take a look at the site. Rose, you know too much!
 
Brian Bales
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If you want old apples the man to talk to is Tom Brown. http://www.applesearch.org/help.html No one has done more to preserve and rediscover lost heirloom apples than this man. He is also all to happy to graft you any of the super rare types from his orchard for about $15 a tree. My orchard has Cheese, Pumpkin, Forward Sour, Fallawater, Hollow Log and many many more. All from Tom.
 
rose macaskie
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Nick mann of habitt aid, did not have a cox orange pippin, he has a appple he says is near to it and so instead of getting the apple tree i want, i have asked for the one that is near to it thinking it might be hardier and i can always buy a cox another day. I looked up a coxy orange pippin some time ago and i think i found one for sale, it seems it is a delicate tree. rose
 
Joe Skeletor
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Location: Blue Island, Illinois - Zone 6a - (Lake Effect) - surrounded by zone 5b
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Cummins Nursery out of New York state have a good selection of Heirloom apple varieties. They are a fairly small nursery, however, and it's late to be ordering trees for this season so their selection is a bit limited right now.

They are extremely helpful and knowledgeable folks,  highly recommend working with them if you need help in the pome department

http://www.cumminsnursery.com/antiques.htm



 
maikeru sumi-e
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PapaBear wrote:
If you want old apples the man to talk to is Tom Brown. http://www.applesearch.org/help.html No one has done more to preserve and rediscover lost heirloom apples than this man. He is also all to happy to graft you any of the super rare types from his orchard for about $15 a tree. My orchard has Cheese, Pumpkin, Forward Sour, Fallawater, Hollow Log and many many more. All from Tom.


Yours and Joe O's suggestions have got me all fired up. I'll look over the lists and the price is very good, a real steal for heirlooms. Most other places I've seen range $30-40. When I get my own place, it would be great to order more and establish a proper orchard.
 
maikeru sumi-e
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rose macaskie wrote:
Nick mann of habitt aid, did not have a cox orange pippin, he has a appple he says is near to it and so instead of getting the apple tree i want, i have asked for the one that is near to it thinking it might be hardier and i can always buy a cox another day. I looked up a coxy orange pippin some time ago and i think i found one for sale, it seems it is a delicate tree. rose


I've read that Cox's Orange Pippin is a sensitive tree. I hope a lot of love, compost, and worm castings will make it happy. I'll probably plant it nearer my house for additional warmth and protection from too much heat and cold, and I may look into adding stones or something similar to what Sepp does for his fruit trees.
 
rose macaskie
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  Its a good idea a lot of love for a not to vigorouse apple tree. I, as yet, doubt my capacity to give it all that is necessary as i am not their often enough. Maybe it is just that i  have not thought it through. I have a brother in law who imagines in his head crawling out of an aeroplane on fire so if it h appens he will be good at it. He is a bit more meurotic than most.  It is a usefull trick, it is easier to do somethign if you ¡magine how to do it in you head first, where you will buy the manure from or get the mulch from. The whole property has such poor soil that i dont like taking mulch from my own land but that situation is changing. rose
 
maikeru sumi-e
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rose macaskie wrote:
  Its a good idea a lot of love for a not to vigorouse apple tree. I, as yet, doubt my capacity to give it all that is necessary as i am not their often enough. Maybe it is just that i  have not thought it through. I have a brother in law who imagines in his head crawling out of an aeroplane on fire so if it h appens he will be good at it. He is a bit more meurotic than most.  It is a usefull trick, it is easier to do somethign if you ¡magine how to do it in you head first, where you will buy the manure from or get the mulch from. The whole property has such poor soil that i dont like taking mulch from my own land but that situation is changing. rose


I've never grown a Cox's orange pippin before, but I try to imagine what the plant will like and what exists in its natural habitat and then provide what I can. Apples are a keystone tree species in their native habitat, and so I imagine appreciate a good forest-like soil, rich in woody debris and compost. I hope making it feel at home will strengthen it and invigorate it. Some eggshells might also perk it up, since I notice how much roses, their near relatives, love a few handfuls of eggshells. Wish me luck.
 
Roger Merry
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Hi

Just a warning - I planted cox and russets because they're my favourite old varieties, but The first few years the flavour was really dissappointing 

Apparently apples not only change flavour with age but seasonal variations in climate and, just to really throw in a wild card, local soil conditions !!

last years russets were really tast though and it was a weird year weather wise so I'm hoping they're going to be good from here on in - still waiting for the coxes though.

Sadly not any local varieties in the literature - probably just never named - but local is always the best way if you can.

R)   
 
rose macaskie
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RNM35. I tis intereesting to hear that apples can be flavourless at first i had heard that some say that sunset tastes like a cox but others say it does not, and that it depends on the weather. Now i will not be too disapointed if my cox does not taste to good in the first few years. In the end i have bought a cox as well as the other apples and two apricots i  think maybe english apricots will be good at that altitude they will be a bit more cold hardy than Spanish ones.
    My soil is so much better than it was in a lot of places that maybe i can start considering it good.  I dont think there is a local apple in guadaljara unless the reineta can be considered local to the whole country, the nurseryies  here just sell things like grannies and such, that you can buy om tjh evegetable shop and in england too, conventional apples fo rnow days so it is more fun to try sommthing else better for bio diversity to i suppose and to keep heritage apples going.
        I have given them root grow at the bottom of the hole i planted them in, in paul stamets products that is called  micogrow i think, the stuff i was sent from England is called root grow. It should micorrhyzise the roots of the trees. I have also planted leguminouse plants by them i have been trying to be permaculture with a counscience at a bit of expense, put my money were my mouth goes.
      As i put in the powder to micorrhyzies the roots i did not put fertiliser at the bottom of the hole incase the fertiliser should encourage bacteria that would gobble up the calory rich fungi spores before they could take a hold on the roots of the trees, Paul Stamets say that the fungi has to take a hold before bacteria take a hold of it .
          I thought of making a hole at the side of the plant and putting fertiliser in the hole in about two weeks or when i get back there because I think that if you put the fertiliser, i have bloood and bone, at a bit of depth at the bottom of a hole, to one side of the tree were it would get washed further down into the earth by the rain, that would encourage the trees roots to grow downward to the fertiliser, where they would be more likely to find some humidity when the dry season comes. This is just an idea it is not a proven fact i just remembe someone ofn the threads saying she gave the plants water with fertiliser in it and the plants roots went right into the water so it seems that roots grow a lot if its towards fertiliser. agri rose macaskie.
  usualy try to plant trees in autumn so they have as long as possible to grow a bit of root before the dry season.  rose .
 
Mekka Pakanohida
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Location: Zone 9 - Coastal Oregon
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Rose and the rest of you who posted, ty, I love you, these links rock!!!   

Edit - We could use a few regional sites like habitataid.co.uk here in the US at my first glance.  Either way, have a great day and thanks for the links all
 
Salkeela Bee
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The site is called habitat aid.help save native habitats and promote biodiversity in the UK.


www.habitataid.co.uk

Thanks for the link.  I didn't know about that site.
 
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