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huglekulture as down hill side of swale??

 
                
Posts: 8
Location: Driftless Region
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Greetings..  So heading sums it up, would any one put wood in the down hill mound of a swale?  Would this area be too wet, or is is a good idea? Thanks
 
Mekka Pakanohida
Posts: 383
Location: Zone 9 - Coastal Oregon
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I am doing just that...  ..but because I have to.

Let me explain, I can't afford earth movers and such, so I built swales of cut limbs and other cuttings from the trees I felled and those are my swales.

They will break down over time, into a hugelkulture swale, as well as be planted, tilled, and everything else by little woodland critters.  They are working already in capturing leaves, and small debris making the swale push water into the ground.  As the branches and such break down, it works a little better each day.

Lazy mans way I guess.

However, I believe if I was to make an actual swale, on contour properly, and then built a hugelkulture bed below the swale I would have a nice swampy in a few years.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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i have more than a few hugelkultur swales in my forest garden. the swales catch the water, the hugel beds hold it, resulting in an excellent growing system for our hot summers with NO rain.
 
              
Posts: 238
Location: swampland virginia
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I have large fallen limbs held in place by sticks to hold leaves and other debris in place. I it has built things up and reduced surface erosion.

Another thing I have done is grabbed bagged leaves from lazy neighbors (ones too lazy to put chemicals on their yard) and dry stack them into a wall and back fill them with yard debris of my own. After a couple years, the tree roots (mostly sweet gum and oaks) grow up in the leaves and hold them in place. A couple swift pulls on the bags and the plastic material is removed. The insides are usually matted together or tree roots found their way into the bags too.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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sure, I don't think it would be too wet unless it turned into a pond !! If there is a lot of water and there is nowhere for it to go, then it might not work out..guess it depends on the property
 
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