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Goat Willow

 
            
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I have one of these growing in my yard. It is a nice looking tree, but does it have any useful properties? Or, should I replace it with something else?
 
Paul Cereghino
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Common names are dangerous.  Latin?  Check out plants for a future
 
            
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Paul Cereghino wrote:
Common names are dangerous.  Latin?  Check out plants for a future


Salix caprea
 
            
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Paul Cereghino wrote:
Check out plants for a future


Thanks for the website! What a great resource.
 
Paul Cereghino
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Sound like our Scouler's Willow (Salix scouleriana), in size and in that it grows in drier soils.  I propagate that with cuttings stuck in the ground in winter (livestakes).  I'd tend to grow it in zone 4 (1/year visits) if I was harvesting for craft or wattles, as you'd only visit once a year.  I might put it as a food forest component in zone 3 (1/month visits) if I was using the poles on a regular basis for something.  Maybe not a top choice addition for a small urban lot, but everyone needs a bottle of aspirin.

Just about everything in the Salicaceae family seems to coppice well (resprout when cut to the ground), which is how you produce the long strait shoots for craft purposes.  We can sell willow stakes for 25 cents a foot here for restoration.  The bark has medicinal market value.  The poles are good for temporary fencing but it rots fast, young whips are good for basketry.  It might be nice for living fence, I bet you could lay hedge, or even living structures.
 
                          
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Wikipedia says it crackles violently when burned. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salix_caprea

Dan
 
rose macaskie
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  The leaves do for browse. Willowas are often attractive trees and the new wood is not to grey in winter the tops of the trees will be reddish of ochre which is an advantage in winter. agri rose macaskie.
 
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