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ID this wood, please!!!  RSS feed

 
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Using this for firewood- any clue what species it is? Is it ash? Or is ash whiter & drier? Thanks!!!
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Could you tell us more about what part of the world you're in?

From the bark, it looks a lot like our local oaks. 
 
Steve Lauren
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r ranson wrote:Could you tell us more about what part of the world you're in?

From the bark, it looks a lot like our local oaks. 



I'm in southeast Pennsylvania. The wood was cut yesterday, split today. Moderately wet inside. Maybe white oak, definitely not red oak. My buddy said maple, but I think this woods grain is a little stringier than most maple I've seen
 
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If that were from round here I would say it was Poplar of some description, the grain looks to straight for oak to me, and the bark is off for Ash
 
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Looks like Silver Maple to me. Were the smaller limbs more "smooth skinned" vs heavily barked?
 
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If you JUST cut it, do you have some of the smaller limbs around (finger thick) or leaves or both? A thin branch plus a good picture of leaves top, bottom, and showing how they attach to the limb would help, thanks.
 
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First thing that came to mind was silver maple for me as well.
 
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Steve,
         That is definitely white ash. I am also in SE PA and burn a ton of it as firewood. Emerald ash borer is killing them so dead ash is everywhere.
Chris
 
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It is White Ash.

Okay for firewood, a little too much ash which i why it got its name, moderate on BTU's, very plentiful, easy to split, does ant hold up well as far as an outside building material, grows to large diameters and is tall without limbs. For my firewood customers I can put SOME in the wood pile, but not a lot, them preferring more higher btu's wood like maple, yellow birch, beech, etc.

Ash has one redeeming quality though; for those that procrastinate on getting their firewood, it will burn right off the stump due to its low moisture content. I did not expect to burn firewood one winter, then at the last minute I had to, so I cut ash firewood and it got me through the winter. It is VERY popular in the spring for those that ran out of firewood too quick and need a little more.

I had floors made out of Ash, but since have switched to White Pine when I redid my kitchen. The only thing I dislike is the smell. Ash STINKS when it is cut. Yuck.
 
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