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jungle mangoes

 
                                
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hello all,
my property is on the edge of the amazon rainforest.  We get AT LEAST 2-3 good rains a week, if not a little everyday.  I am told that mangoes, when grown here, are unlikely to fruit.  I assume this is because of the constantly high levels of moisture creating favorable conditions for arthracnose fungus. (This is at least what I read).  I am told they grow really well on the coast, but since I am not on the coast, and I am in the rainforest, I would like to have my mangoes and eat them too.

Any thoughts on how to create a dry micro-climate that may not be so favorable to anti-fruiting fungi?  Could there possibly be complimentary plants that would inhibit such a thing?  I thought about maybe giving the trees full on sun and having them planted in a trench of imported sand.  Don't know if this would do anything...
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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Yeah, mangoes like a bit of drought now and then.  Sand would be the best guess, maybe a raised hill of sand?  If you have to go much beyond that to get mangoes, I'd say choose something more suited to your climate. 
 
Leif Kravis
Posts: 78
Location: Toronto Canada
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Is there a drier season in your climate? Mangoes produce fruit approx 8 months after tip pruning so you should be able to get them to set fruit by timing the pruning  so that the blossoming occurs in a drier period if one occurs.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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