• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Spring grasses northern oklahoma  RSS feed

 
Posts: 22
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have worked two years to improve 70 acre pasture. My family was upset I did not want poison sprayed so they put up goat fence for a year and brought in 51 goats. This year was asked to test a product called fulvic and they sent microbes to grow and add to mix. Family has acres across road but they use this pasture for weening and bringing over new mom cows. Too many sometimes. Anyway I planted some fescue and white clover in October and November broadcasted a lot of rye. I also purchased red clover to plant in spring and wondered if I should plan to plant other seeds too. Dr Ingrams list are not ones I have ever heard. 
 
Posts: 46
Location: Oklahoma - Zone 6b today 7a tomorrow
5
chicken food preservation forest garden
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Might take a look at bluestem.
 
Cinda Wood
Posts: 22
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I will. There is some right now but it seems they do not eat parts and then it grows tall in clumps. Maybe what I was told was blue grass isn't though. I will study thank you.
 
Posts: 38
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cinda, I'm in the Texas panhandle. Look into blue grama. It's very palatable and after a freeze it cures well retaining a good amount of protein. Blue stem is palatable when young. As it matures it gets tough and less palatable. It doesn't retain as much nutrition as blue grama after the freeze.
 
Ron Metz
Posts: 38
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One other thing. Blue grama is not the same thing as bluegrass.
 
The two armies met. But instead of battle, they decided to eat some pie and contemplate this tiny ad:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!