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Permits and inspections?  RSS feed

 
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My familiarity with building permits is very limited. I sometimes think that an ideal farm would be restricited because of law violations and acquiring permits to construct. What comes to mind are compost toilets, gray water, and black water setups. As well as natural building structures. I know some places, (mostly in the U.S.) does not support the use of or outlaw the use of black water and compost toilet. Is this entirely true?

My question is what have been some obstacles in using black water, gray water, compost toilet, and constructing natural type buildings in accordance to the law and legal permits?

I have seen some very creative housing structures made with reusable materials, yet I do not think some would pass inspection and so forth.

I also understand that it really depends on what country, state, county you live in. None the less, I am curious to enlighten my self on this topic.

Thanks
 
                            
Posts: 126
Location: Ava, Mo, USA, Earth
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In most of rural Missouri, there are no building codes.  There is an EPA-mandated state law that says you have to have a perc-aproved septic system if you build on less than 3 (or 5?) acres.  It varies from county to county, so make double sure before you buy.
 
Posts: 254
Location: Virginia
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that concept wouldnt fly legally in VA.  you need permits for everything.  and with newer septic codes. its harder to find land that would perc.  even with the other than traditional septic methods.
 
                                
Posts: 62
Location: Western Pennsylvania
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Pennsylvania now has a state wide building code instead of just township by township.  Now even people in the back country have to follow the codes like the town people.  Sad thing is I don't know of a septic tank being allowed, no matter what.  It's now all sand mounds.  They are unsightly and after a rain you see water just sitting around them. 

You can only grandfather a septic system in if you have owned the property for X amount of years and it is X amount of acres.

A good composting system would work much better, but the other keeps contractors working and keeps people from doing things themselves.  And it keeps the government involved with your property. 

Tami 
 
                              
Posts: 16
Location: MO
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homesteadpaul wrote:
In most of rural Missouri, there are no building codes.  There is an EPA-mandated state law that says you have to have a perc-aproved septic system if you build on less than 3 (or 5?) acres.  It varies from county to county, so make double sure before you buy.



I believe it's 3 acres at minimum. I live in MO and had this issue when looking at a 2 acre plot. But I will second what homesteadpaul has said; rural Missouri is great for permaculture.
 
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Don't move to Michigan, at least, not the part I live in.

Has to be permitted, inspected, signed, sealed, inspected some more, etc etc etc.  And not very flexible about anything "new".

For various other reasons, I find this a good spot to live in, so I make the best of it with superinsulated building techniques that do pass code, are not expensive, and work well.  That's more or less my mission, to show people how to do it within code, because that's where a lot of us are stuck.

HTH,

troy
 
                                
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oracle wrote:
My familiarity with building permits is very limited. I sometimes think that an ideal farm would be restricited because of law violations and acquiring permits to construct. What comes to mind are compost toilets, gray water, and black water setups. As well as natural building structures. I know some places, (mostly in the U.S.) does not support the use of or outlaw the use of black water and compost toilet. Is this entirely true?

My question is what have been some obstacles in using black water, gray water, compost toilet, and constructing natural type buildings in accordance to the law and legal permits?

I have seen some very creative housing structures made with reusable materials, yet I do not think some would pass inspection and so forth.

I also understand that it really depends on what country, state, county you live in. None the less, I am curious to enlighten my self on this topic.

Thanks

 
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