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How to read $/cwt

 
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Hello fellow permies,

This is such a stupid question, but I don't know how to decipher $680/990.83cwt. This is the average price for a pasture raised hog's whole carcass. This figure is according to the USDA national monthly pasture raised pork report. I am trying to apply for the value add producers grant, and need to convert this to price per pound. I am horrible at math, so if someone could just tell me what it is and how to figure it out I would be so greatfull.  

Thank you so much

Meagan.
 
Mother Tree
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cwt is 'hundred weight', or 112 lb.

I guess it's really hundred-and-twelve weight.  Imperial units of measurement are weird...

So to convert, divide the figures you have by 112.
 
pollinator
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Burra Maluca wrote:cwt is 'hundred weight', or 112 lb.

I guess it's really hundred-and-twelve weight.  Imperial units of measurement are weird...

So to convert, divide the figures you have by 112.



It depends on where you are.  

In the USA a hundred weight is usually 100 lbs.

112 lbs is the British definition of "hundred weight", common in the UK and other countries that used to be part of the British Empire.
The British had some really odd units of measure, some of which are still used.  For example, it's still fairly common in the UK to describe someone by how many 'stone' they weigh.  
A 'stone' is 14 lbs.  8 stone = 112 lbs, which I'm guessing is where their definition of "hundred weight' comes from.
 
pollinator
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Cwt does mean hundred weight and in the US and Canada that will mean 100lbs. That number might be a range of prices for pastured pork, which would mean $6.80/lb to $9.90/lb.
The US is a large country so I would suggest looking at local farmers markets to find what you could charge. Then look at your costs of buying, housing, feeding and butchering pigs to decide if you can make money at the price you can get.
 
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