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100 Year old brick building rocket stove ideas  RSS feed

 
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I am now in possession of a 100 yo building, 33' x 110', 3 stories. It's drafty in parts (single pane store front, old window, etc.) which we are working on. The walls are 12" thick brick except in parts of the basement where there is thicker foundation, up to 36inches of brick/block/stone. Three side of the basement wall are below grade, with one long side being exposed. The question is, if I put in a rocket stove, could I or should I use cobb to connect the stove to the existing below grade basement walls as thermal mass, or would I just be conducting all of the energy into the earth? Should I instead build a separate thermal sink wall or something? If this is a silly question, feel free to ignore. I'm kind of new to this. I've been watching videos, but everything seems to be about smaller spaces. Any thoughts or resources you could point me to would be helpful.
 
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Location: Upstate NY, zone 5
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The brick walls are great mass, but if exposed to outside or earth without insulation on the outer face, will mostly be heat sinks trying to heat the great outdoors or the earth. If there is any party wall, that is good (your neighbor will love you).
 
Glenn Herbert
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110' is a long stretch to try to heat with one RMH; I think you would get better results with two of them on each floor, or perhaps two with multi-floor distribution (look for threads about this, as it has been done, with multiple bells).

What is the siting of this building? One long wall is apparently exposed, but is the other one exposed or abutting another building?
What is the proposed occupancy and usage pattern?
What is the climate?
 
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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Damn it, all photos are gone! http://donkey32.proboards.com/thread/1973/8-215mm-double-bells-built
 
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