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Home-made Washing Up Liquid  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 933
Location: France
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Does anyone make their own washing up liquid?  I've been having a go but it just doesn't cut the grease so hubby won't use it, not even for non-greasy things    I need a better recipe.  Can anyone share please?
 
Posts: 438
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It would help to know what you're using now so we don't suggest that very thing!

Here is a list of recipes, the best (IMO) are the ones calling for liquid castile and vinegar or lemon juice. I imagine baking soda in water would work as well though for greasy dishes I'd go for the soap solution and sprinkle baking soda on as needed to scour.

http://www.ehow.com/search.html?q=dish+soap&skin=home
 
Posts: 26
Location: North Central Mississippi
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You can liquify bar soap & add in a nice scrubby material to it.

For liquid soap, grate the bar soap, add a little water & heat it up until it melts. While its still warm, add a bit more water until it is a bit thinner than regular liquid soap (it will firm up a bit when it cools) Mix it well using a wire whisk or blender.
Then add in some pumice, coffee grounds, clean sand, ground apricot, kelp, oatmeal or other abrasive material, and put in a container. You will need to shake the container before using.

The scrubby stuff will help get the grease off.

I also have made bar soap (hot process) that had coffee grounds in it. It works very well.
 
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Microwave ovens work well for melting soap.  i know a guy who puts all of the butt ends of bars into an old sock, zaps it in the microwave, and ends up with a holdable soapy scrub rag.
 
Posts: 69
Location: Maricopa, AZ
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I've started using soap nuts for doing my laundry.  I order in bulk and make a tea by simmering the dried berries in water, then straining and storing in the fridge. I use the liquid for all my laundry and a fair amount of my cleaning. You can dilute it and it makes a great window cleaner. Use it full strength with a little baking soda for scrubbing.

The leftover smushy soap nuts are just thrown out in the garden. No chemicals and no waste.

If you are interested, I can give my exact recipe for making the soap nut tea. I will never go back to commercial laundry detergent! My towels are soooo fluffy and absorbent and the clothes don't irritate sensitive skin.

I order them from NaturOli. You can find info about using them on soapnuts.pro. I stumbled on it by accident and now wonder why the organic/no chemical people aren't all over it!
 
Alison Thomas
pollinator
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Location: France
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Thanks Becky, I had been thinking about soapnuts for laundry - I currently make my own liquid from washing soda, bicarb etc.  It does a fine job but it was for doing dishes that I had the problem, hence the post.

T. Joy - the recipe I have is for the very things you mention - vinegar, lemon juice, and castille soap.  The only thing I did differently was that I used an organic liquid soap base that wasn't castille.  Do you think that makes a difference?  Maybe it was watered down so much that it's not so good when mixed with more water as per the recipe.  Perhaps I'll try more soap in the mix - just didn't want to put out more soap into the earth than was necessary, even if it's organic.
 
Becky Pinaz
Posts: 69
Location: Maricopa, AZ
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If you don't mind buying rather than making your soap, NaturOli has recently come out with a dish washing soap, but it is not for use in the dishwasher. I haven't tried it, but they are raving about it on their site. I have to say that my communications with them have been very helpful and exceeding low on the BS factor. They would certainly be worth looking at.
 
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