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New community near Seattle seeking members  RSS feed

 
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No, we do not have land yet.

Anyone still reading? Greetings; I'm Michael Leonard. Let's talk about strategy. If you're here, you've had this discussion a few times: "Find a few people...pool your resources...happily ever after...", yes? It sounds fairly simple, until you start making serious plans and talk to people. The 20th century model of community land projects was a bit more straightforward. Property was cheaper, and working-class people could afford it. We have to adapt if we want this idea to work in the current reality. I'm certain everyone here has an amazing list of ideas they want to build when they have the space? Great...but, then what? How do you keep the land once you get it?

We are a small group of capable, dedicated people with an ethical business plan. We're called 'Strowler Enterprises' (currently working on our website). Our project is designed to become self-sustaining within five years. We are equal co-owners, and practice profit-sharing. I gather that no one here needs an entry-level lesson in environmental sustainability, social inclusion, or progressive values? Suffice to say, we're enthusiastic about them!

What we don't have: Land or money.
So, what *do* we have, at this point in time?

-Avenues in place to raise a down payment.
-Well-researched cost/revenue spreadsheets.
-An attorney to draft a land trust agreement.
-Company bylaws to protect us and our investment.
-Benefit plan for company members.
-Specific properties to choose from, for their ideal features and commuting distance.
-Contractors who specialize in our planned architecture.
-Realistic timeline for building.
-Client base who we have a current and active relationship with.
-Marketing strategy to draw additional clientele.

You can read about our project in greater detail here: https://www.ic.org/directory/strowler-enterprises/
Or contact me directly: leonardmichaelj@gmail.com
 
Michael Leonard
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Update: We're focused on places in Snohomish county, if that's a deciding factor in your interest. My first question for you, potential land-mate; can you commute back and forth between your day job? If not, how can we help accommodate that?

Second; how soon can you walk away from your current living situation? As of this month, we have enough investors to acquire a property. In practical terms, the number of people disperses the cost of monthly payments on our mortgage to a level comparable to average rent in Seattle. Joining the project now means lowering the cost below average rent.

Your next question will be in regards to timeline. That would be summer of this year.
 
Michael Leonard
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The first week of June, the Seattle International Film Festival will screen the pilot episode of the web series 'Strowlers' 


Does the name ring a bell? It should- we have the production team's blessing to use it in our marketing. Brand recognition goes a long way to generate interest. The Strowlers cinematic universe has elements that speak to us: Hidden worlds, exploring our potential, resisting oppression, reaching out to bond with kindred spirits, collaborative projects, and not only surviving, but leading the changing reality.

Why should you care? Because our website is launching soon, and the spike in web traffic from the festival will lead to clientele, to support our business model. Being part of the foundation team is an opportunity to shape the project. As fellow visionaries, you can see its potential.
 
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I enjoyed looking at your information page (https://www.ic.org/directory/strowler-enterprises/). Are you looking at northern or eastern Snhohomish County? I like the idea of it being a LARPing/SCA/other event ground, as well as an intentional community, and fascinated to know how that all works out with permitting. I'm happily settled in my 5 acres, but it might be fun to visit your community when you get it started!
 
Michael Leonard
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So true! Zoning is the Achilles heel that ends many land projects before they begin. We've done our research; and have several properties on our radar which are, in fact, zoned to operate a business.
 
Michael Leonard
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And we are live on the "Information Superhighway"!

https://www.strowlerenterprises.com

Preemptively answering three questions: 1- We don't have a great mobile version yet. If you're using a phone, it's going to squish some of the text on one or two pages. 2- If you're viewing it on a widescreen monitor, everything offsets to the left of the screen...we're working to resolve it. 3- All the example pics are public domain stock photos.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I'm curious as to whether or not there will be long-term residents on your site. On your website you talk about Meadow--which is a camping site, and Haven--which is cabins. Would long-term residents live in Haven, or somewhere else? How large would their plots be? Would they be able to garden on their own land, or only in the "Garden" area?

This sounds like it's going to be a really cool place--I think my family would enjoy visiting when it's all built!
 
Michael Leonard
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Very good questions! People interested enough to contact us will be invited to start a conversation, and build a rapport with the team. On-site living arrangements for project partners will be negotiated based on balancing their needs with ours.
 
Michael Leonard
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And we are officially on FB: https://www.alpha.facebook.com/StrowlerEnterprises/

Finally- clickbait that takes you someplace fun!
 
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