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dioscorea nipponica Available Locally, Should I add it to my Yarden?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Dioscorea Nipponica is available at my local permaculture nursery.
Its a Yam, but its not the most reported on.

Rolling Hills Nursery,list it as edible.

PFAF gives it great review.

Does anyone here have experience with this plant?
 
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That is also known as Shan Yao, one of the true Yams and it is very good food.
I would grow it, it also is a medicinal and the flavor is very nice.

I first found out about this yam from a Japanese family that lived across the street from me in California.
He and I exchanged a lot of methods and techniques over a 4 year period (I even worked at his nursery for a year).

Remember the leaves oppose directly across from each other on the edible species of true yams.

Redhawk
 
William Bronson
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Thank you Bryant,I was worried about getting a dreaded "air potato" by another name!
Your familiarity with it is reassuring.
Did you use only the actual yam or did you also use the aerial tubers?

A side note, the foliage of sweet potatoes are edible, does that apply to yams as well?

I've done some research, and I think in addition to this plant, I will buy a variety of true yams from CAM and Jungle Jims, and plant them, just to see what works.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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you can use both the flower (aerial tubers) and the root (actual yam) they have different flavors (both pretty dang awesome to my pallet).
 
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