• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Wild coyote squash/gourd in the desert. Natural pesticide?  RSS feed

 
                            
Posts: 132
5
bike greening the desert trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I did a couple of quick searches on here but didn't find too much info. 
I was playing catch with my dogs today in the desert and came across several unusually green plants growing in a somewhat remote location here in Southern Utah.  I genuinely thought it was watermelon, and that I was on someone's garden when I came across them, lol.  They looked wild, uncared for, and looked pretty good considering.  No sign of water close by seeing as how they were the only thing growing.  It hasn't rained here in a couple of months, and it's been over 100f for at least a couple of weeks with humidity in the teens or lower.

I read online people claim it works as a pesticide?  It is about the nastiest tasting thing ever (talk about pucker face, lol, trust me), but the seeds are high in fat and protein (30% of each) from what I've read.  That awful taste makes me wonder?  I read that it's virtually pest free itself?  Is there something to the idea of grinding it up and spraying it on other plants in the garden?  Any results from anyone?

I pulled a melon off, opened it up, and saved the seeds to see if I can get them to sprout.


Just curious about any positive or negative feedback about them.  I threw the cut melon into the chicken coop, and they pecked at it a little.  I read it'll clean a human's intestinal track out pretty good......are my chickens going to have the shits for the next month? 

It just seems like I should be planting this thing everywhere I can out here.  It's perennial, and grows a gigantic tap root.  That's what I'm looking for, right?  Lot's of survival uses for it, but realistically I don't foresee needing it for that.  Just as a perennial that can feed my animals, wont need water, and can be used as compost.  Wow if it's an organic pesticide as well?  It just seems like it'd be more popular if all that were all true.

Thanks.

20180627_102243.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180627_102243.jpg]
20180627_102236.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180627_102236.jpg]
20180627_102401.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180627_102401.jpg]
20180627_102321.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180627_102321.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 781
Location: Ohio, USA
84
dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cool. Coyote Melon/Gourd.
" The pulp within the fruit is unpalatable, but was utilized by native people and during the depression, for soap. Clothing laundered with the soap reportedly helps to repel body lice.

The seeds are edible, unlike the pulp, and contain value as a source of protein (31%), and cooking oil (30%). The dried gourds have been used as rattles and containers. After the plant has gone to fruit, the stems dry up and wither away, later to re-sprout from the tuberous root once sufficient rains return."

http://www.livingdesert.org/plant/coyote-melon/
 
pollinator
Posts: 177
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
25
chicken duck homestead cooking trees wood heat woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
AKA Chichicoyotl, "Trickster Gourd." O'odham mothers would put the juice on their breasts when they wanted to wean a toddler. Bet it worked the first time...that has got to be the bitterest stuff in existence.

Great fun for batting practice either green or dry.
 
                            
Posts: 132
5
bike greening the desert trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Phil, that is just wrong.  How inhumane to do that to a child.  Ruined for life after that I'd guess!  lol  The psychological damage has got to be immeasurable! 
Too bad I don't play sports!  Probably good to swing a golf club at too?  A fun way to propagate the plant for sure!

Amit, yeah, to all of that.  Thanks!

 
Phil Stevens
pollinator
Posts: 177
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
25
chicken duck homestead cooking trees wood heat woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not to mention the implications for foreplay.
 
A berm makes a great wind break. And Iwe all like to break wind once in a while. Like this tiny ad:
five days of natural building (wofati and cob) and rocket cooktop oct 8-12, 2018
https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!