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Cluster Fig Tree from cuttings  RSS feed

 
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Hello,

I am planning to plant a cluster Fig tree grown from cuttings. Does anyone have experience in growing big trees from cuttings? Do cutting grown trees have a weaker root system?

I am planning to plant this cluster Fig tree in my farm. There are rocks 10 feet below soil, I want the cluster fig tree to penetrate these rocks and go deep vertically below. I actually want to plant a seed grown tree but I have to get it small size from nursery and grow it for months in a small container then plant it in farm due to non availability of big seed grown trees in nurseries.

Cutting grown trees of over 6 feet are readily available in nurseries which I can plant in the farm.

I seek suggestions on this. Fig trees are normally strong and have a strong penetrating root system. But will the cutting grown tree have strong roots as the seed grown tree? Since I require the roots to be strong, is it better to plant a seed grown tree by taking the extra time and effort?
 
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Figs are not tap root trees so cutting produced trees will do fine.
I'm not really sure what you mean by "strong root system", all trees have roots that will find the cracks in rocks and use them.
As the root grows it will exert pressure on the crack in the rock and eventually the root wins and the rock cracks.
This is true of all tree root systems.
The deepest roots found are over 400 feet long (deep) they grew through rock and their tips are now at the floor of a cave.

The strangler fig is the tree you see in photos growing over ancient buildings and ripping them apart.
 
Saravanan Balaraman
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Hi, apologize for the mistake, there are many varieties of figs, I was talking about FICUS RACEMOSA or the cluster fig tree. I have read that in general, cutting grown trees have weaker roots compared with seed grown and grafted trees.

I am not an expert in tree root system, but from your explanation I understand that fig trees do not have taproot hence the roots will be having the same strength and vigour and would grow fast and penetrate the rocks as good as the seed grown Ficus Racemosa tree. I am interested in growing this tree. I will go ahead and plant this tree from cutting.

Thanks a lot for your input.
 
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My understanding is that F. racemosa is in Ficus subgenera Urostigma, which is the easiest to propagate from cuttings. The Australian Urostigma trees are often a bit more difficult though, is the provenance of your tree Australia or elsewhere?

I have never grown this species, but I have done a lot of cuttings with other Ficus spp. Ficus macrophylla columnaris is my favourite fig tree for my climate, being a true massive banyan that is well adapted to a mild temperate climate. With this species I have found cuttings are difficult inversely proportional to the amount of care you take.  If you carefully take soft or semi-hardwood cuttings and propagate them in controlled  environments with auxin and mist they will almost certainly die. Hack a bit off with a machete and poke it into the ground and it grows well. In Africa F. thonningii is grown by farmers by taking cuttings up to 20' long and direct placing them in situ.  You'll need to experiment with cluster fig, but being Urostigma there is a good chance tall cuttings will work in situ. Better still if you can find some genetic material with existing aerial roots.

The root strength comment almost certainly refers to small seedlings vs small cutting grown plants. Obviously cuttings have more delicate roots than a seedling when young. Give it a year or two and there will be no difference. The great thing about Ficus spp is their amazing roots.
 
Saravanan Balaraman
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The subgenus urostigma have aerial roots like banyan. Ficus Racemosa does not have aerial roots. I am in India, the Main ficus trees are the Banyan - Ficus Benghalensis(with aerial roots), Peepal - Ficus Religiosa and Ficus Racemosa.

Ficus Racemosa has been propagated by cuttings and once they sell them they are over 6 feet tall, so by this time they must have developed good root system. I am not sure how long the cuttings were when they rooted them, but I am sure it's not a complicated process.
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Ficus Racemosa
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Ficus Racemosa
 
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I am not familiar with the  Ficus Racemosa so I don't know what kind of branches are available for cuttings.
The black mission figs in California had wide spreading limbs that could be cut off at 4 to 6 foot lengths.  We made 4 foot deep drilled with a pipe and water pressure and inserted these branches to the bottom.  These aparently developed root during the winter rains and started growing from the tip in the spring. Were able to make a hedge on south and west fence lines to shade the house this way.
 
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