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I need help researching the Water Powered Mills in Mt. Washington, Massachusetts Photo of Turbine

 
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I need help researching the Water Powered Mills & foundry which were operating on my families property in the 1800's.
Photos can be seen by the link below.
Have been trying to find everything about how the Mills, Foundry, & also this area, called "The City" of this small very rural town, functioned.
I am sure this was dangerous work especially due to being 10 miles away from a hospital.
It also so fascinates me how much work was involved to make the "City" function.
The major accomplishment of building the very substantial Dams at a time when no power machinery was available was incredable!

This Turbine was from one of the Mills located in "The City" which the brook, City Brook, was named in the town of Mt. Washington, Massachusetts in the 1800's.
There was a Sawmill, Gristmill, Iron Foundry, Black Smith,Boot & Shoemaker & Tannery located there. At that time there were 400 or so workers employed! The 2010 census shows population of 167!  Unfortunately in 1955 twin hurricanes Connie & Diane dropped 22 inches of rain in a week flooding the area washed out the 3 Dams & the Mills!
Link to photos regarding Turbine Mill Wheel "The City" Mt. Washington, Massachusetts:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/yourbroker/albums/72157672722554608https://www.flickr.com/photos/yourbroker/albums/72157672722554608  

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This is a sketch of what was "The City" with the Mills
 
Scott Reed
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This is the Correct Link to see photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/yourbroker/albums/72157672722554608
 
pollinator
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I think a place to start is

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Scott Reed
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Thanks, I have contacted them & I actually have more info regarding this than the did.
I shared it with them about 4 months ago.
 
pollinator
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Is it this one?  HERE

If not ,what modern day city is it located in?
 
pollinator
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I do not have much information for you because Mount Washington could be replaced with any town in New England and it would still be the same. Before electricity, our melting snow powered a nation. My own town had a tannery, gristmill, sawmills, blacksmith shops, gun smith shop, etc so unless you know the exact names of these companies, it may be hard to find more information about them. If you do know them however, the local newspaper can be of help if they have the archives on microfilm. (Microfiche I think its called)

By the way, the hurricanes and gale of 1955 had a lasting influence on farming all across New England, and is where many existing swales were formed. On my own farm, we had potatoes, and all that rain caused incredible loss of soil from where it ran down the gulley's between the rows of potatoes. In fact on the uphill slope of rock walls, some of that beautiful loam is 6 feet deep!
 
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