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saving cucuzza seed

 
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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My cucuzza, or cucuzzi, depending on which seed source I purchase it from, is nearing the point I need to decide which plant I am saving seed from. I once read that once a vine produced a fruit with mature seed, it will die. I have 4 vines. 3 have 1 fruit each. 1 has 2. I would think that seeds from this plant would be the best genetics?

An article on growing this squash of Lagenaria siceraria family. It has white flowers! https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/squash/cucuzza-squash-plants.htm
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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In my opinion, it's best to save seeds from all of the plants with the goal of maintaining the best genetic diversity for future years... You might save seeds from the plant with more fruits separately, so you can plant a high percentage of the patch with that seed next year.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Well.. I was planning to eat the others, before the seeds got too tough. As in mature. Not great for diversity. But maybe a couple more fruits will set, with the other fruits, not having mature seed.
 
Your buns are mine! But you can have this tiny ad:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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