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Does anyone grow nectarines or pluots in Kentucky?

 
Posts: 3
Location: Kentucky (zone 6a)
3
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Just curious if anyone has been successful. I know there are problems with certain fruit trees in Kentucky. Late frosts and such.

But even if I don't get fruit every year, it might be worth it to me if the trees can thrive well.

Anyone had any luck?

Thanks.
 
pollinator
Posts: 328
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
30
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I am growing 4 pluots in North Alabama.  They are on their 3rd winter here.  I prune them back a bit more than usual so I can use frost cloth if needed.  They are still too young to product fruit but I hope after this one winter I will not need to cover and I will let the late frost do what it may.  I have three different varieties so hoping they dont all flower at once.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2389
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
126
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You actually need the flowering to overlap so that they different cultivars can cross pollinate each other because they are not self-fertile. Also have to prune all the grafts so that no single one takes up all the sunlight/water/mineral and then also have to prune if you want the tree to be short like I do. peaches and nectarine are the same species just different cultivars, I can see you getting enough chill hours so no worries on that front. As for late frost, I think that whether you live in Maine/Canada or Florida late frost is always an issue. Hopefully you will get some 1st hand account of cultivars that work for your location.
 
Posts: 28
Location: Kentucky - Zone6
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There are cold-hardy varieties that work in Kentucky (I have no experience with them, though)
 
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