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storage veggies to plant late season ?  RSS feed

 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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I'm giving up on the potatoes and the pintos didn't come in.  These were our "meat" and storage food for this fall and winter. 

Some squash blooming, but not enough plants to do much.  We'll be canning a ton of tomatoes and there are a good big of Jerusalem artichokes.

I'm planning the fall garden now and cold frame/greenhouse stuff like lettuce and spinach.  I just can't think of anything really hearty that I can put in this late?  Maybe it's just hot and my brain is scrambled. 
 
Ken Peavey
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Location: FL
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For Cold crops, plant Cole crops.

turnip
collards
rutabaga
kohlrabi
mustard
cauliflower
brocolli
brussels sprouts

Still time to get some green beans in
Carrots will take a freeze, as will peas.
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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Love it!!! Thanks! I could store the turnips.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Broad beans, aka favas. Cool weather crop, high protein, use fresh or dried, really tough plants, great for the soil and a fantastic carbon crop. Yay for broad beans
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I don't know where you're located, but beets are a common autumn crop (winter crop in the deep south).  As long as you don't cut more than 1/3 of the leaves from any plant, you will have fresh greens, and later, some nice roots.  They store well.  Cooked and sliced beets add a nice splash of color to winter salads, an well as nutrients.
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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OK, I see that you are in the Ozarks.  Another good late crop is snow Peas (Chinese Peas).  They are +/- 60 days from seed to plate.  If you can time your first frost, set out a group of them 3-4 weeks before first frost (you don't want them to begin flowering before frost).  Once the frost hits, they will go dormant until the soil warms in the spring.  Once the soil warms, they will resume growing where they left off, and you will be rewarded with an extra early crop.
 
                                    
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John, can I do that with snow peas in TN? This will be my first fall or winter garden. It is what is keeping me from getting depressed from the nightmare of this summer garden!

Thta is a great list of cool weather things for you to try. Hope you get something good to put up for the winter!
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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dont forget the various kales, it tastes better after its gone through some cold weather. extremely good for you too.
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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These are all going on the list.  I planted a good bit of these this spring and they didn't do well.  We have cold frames in the greenhouse, so that's being cleaned out today and I'll schedule plantings tonight.  I hope my fall/winter garden does great! 
 
Ken Peavey
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Location: FL
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Alliums are fine cool season crops.

Onion
Shallot
Leek
Garlic

Onions may reach a suitable size for use.  If left in over winter, they will resume growing in the spring.  The first year onions will store well.  The onions that continue growing come spring will bolt, offering seed.  Those 2nd year onions will not store well-the bolting allows the onions to decay rapidly from the inside out.

Garlic needs the freeze to cause the bulb to split into cloves.  Hardneck garlic will send up a flower shoot next year.  This is a scape.  Harvest before the bulb opens up. Steam it, add a little butter.  Good Eatin.

Biennial crops will make it through the winter.  The 2nd year they may not be at their best for the dinner table, but you'll be able to harvest your own open pollenated seed.
Beets
Chard
Radish
Cabbage

Radish grows so fast, you'll get a fine crop out of them.

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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even here in the great white north you can put in some crops for a fall garden..check out your growing season and frost dates and then put in anything that can handle the temp during the length of time you have left before your first fall frost..

problem here is the heat right now..so if you have a heat/drought situation you might want to start some of your seedlings inside where you can watch over them and plant them out when you get a rainy spell..
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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Oh yes on the garlic.  We planted that last August and will harvest any day now.  I broke the necks over last week and pulled one today to see how it looks.  Not to shabby for a first year garden in soil that was too dense.  I'll replant a good bit of those.  The onions aren't looking too bad either and I'll pull those up in the next few days as well. 
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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@ lilacgirl:

TN is either zone 6 or 7.  I have done the snow peas with success in zone 7, but don't know about zone 6 (yet).  A typical packet of seeds has around 100 seeds.  Try it with 20 seeds this winter, then even if it doesn't work, you still have 80 seeds for next spring/summer.  If it does work, as soon as you see regrowth next spring, plant your next succession planting.  If you succession plant every 3-4 weeks, you will have continuous crops until first frost next year.  For best results, pick them young (slightly immature).  The bigger they get, they lose tenderness.
 
                                    
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Thanks John, I'lll save that so it's handy come Fall. J
 
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