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pioneer
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I will be coppicing some trees this coming winter. I want to use some of the wood for mushrooms! I am leaning toward purchasing Inoculated wood plugs to put in the logs.

I will be dropping some Mulberry, and Bradford pears. I may decide to cut some undetermined variety of columnar Maple as well. I think the largest diameter will be 8” while most will be more like 3” to 4”.

What mushrooms would work on these wood varieties, and how long should I cut the logs? Any other advice?
 
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Check at fungi perfecti or other mushroom spawn sellers to check and see if those woods are good for growing mushrooms.
Most of the logs I use are either hickory or oak (nut trees work very well for most mushrooms) if you want chicken of the woods you would need a conifer wood.
I grow oyster, shitake and lions mane on oak or hickory and they do very well.

I like logs I can pick up so mine are usually in the 6 to 8 inch diameter range and I only make them three feet long.
I cut and inoculate as soon after as possible because I have so many different spores floating around on buzzard's roost that if I waited the logs would be compromised.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Well, I finally found something.

https://articles.extension.org/pages/66793/what-kinds-of-trees-can-be-used-for-log-cultivation-of-mushrooms

Some examples of commonly produced mushrooms that grow on logs and/or wood substrates (rather than manure or soil) include:

    Shiitake: oaks, elms, sweetgum, beech
   Oysters: maple, oaks, mulberry, quaking aspen
    Lion's mane or pom-pom: beech, oaks



Fungi Perfecti agrees. And Rieshi too!

And what about pear? https://permies.com/t/58904/Shitake-mushrooms-pear-plum-logs

Really, I did do a search before asking! Must have used the wrong word order!
 
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