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Cedar Apple Rust (spring planning early)

 
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I have a Honeycrisp apple tree that has been devestated the last couple years by Cedar Apple Rust.  The first couple years I seemed to have some luck with a spray and was able to get some delicious apples.  Has anyone had any luck with specific fungicide sprays?  Unfortunately if I can't get the tree to be healthy in 2019 I will remove for a more resistant variety or completely different fruit tree.  The idea of pulling a tree that you put several years into is disappointing.

Thanks  
 
gardener
Posts: 6697
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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The fungus lives in the soil over the winter so you will need to remove all leaf materials within a 30 foot radius just to be sure you get as much as possible.
Next you want to use a good batch of compost tea to soak that cleared area, this should put enough good microorganisms into the soil to eradicate the fungus, also spray the tree trunk and all branches.
If in doubt, do multiple soakings with your good, aerated compost tea, saving the fungicide as the last resort (early spring).

It's also a good idea to get rid of any junipers growing on your land that are in the wind direction of the fruit trees, that's the intermediate carrier of this disease.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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J,

Rust is awful. I have not even bothered to plant non-resistant varieties. We have all the rusts here, but the Junipers are the common denominator, so I am removing them.

Living Energy Farms has a great publication on resistant apples, pears, etc. I have found it invaluable. Depending on your location Honeycrisp may be a total loss. They are grown here with heavy chemical application.
 
J Sullivan
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Unfortunately I live in suburbia and my neighbor has a tree that is the culprit so I am legally bound to not chop his tree down
I would really like to avoid heavy chemical applications.   I will have to look into the tea to see what is the best components to help deal with rust.
 
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