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Slatted floor for sheep

 
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I’m building a small shed for sheep. It’s 8x10 and it’s moveable, if needed. Since it’s on skids, it’s elevated and I was thinking about putting in a removable slatted floor instead of a solid floor. There doesn’t seem to be a supplier of quality plastic slatted floor anywhere in America, so I figured I would build them out of wood.

Does anyone use them? The sheep have a huge pasture to roam so this would just be for nighttime and for the ewes to birth when needed.

I haven’t been able to find dimensions anywhere. Does anyone have any info? Advice? Suggestions?

Thank you
 
gardener
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Hi Matthew;  Are you wanting a slatted floor to avoid cleaning inside or for ventilation ?  If this shed is for sleeping / birthing, I would suggest using a solid floor . Less chance of a new born leg slipping thru, or a reptile coming in. Clean up on sheep is not to bad,and if you need ventilation , add a window or an attic gable vent.
 
Matthew Steven
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Thanks for the info. What kind of sheep do you have?

I would like a slatted floor to help keep it cleaner. Not many harmful reptiles around here.

It’s mainly for nighttime sleeping. The shed might be used for birthing and I can always put wood on top of the slats.

And I would like to try a slatted floor just to see how it works out. I can always replace it with a solid floor in the future
 
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Sheep in general have a habit of running into trouble. So I'd be wary of a slatted floor. I could see them getting half of a foot caught, then twisting and struggling, ending up with a broken foot or worse. Around where I am, I've had sheep get a foot caught in a lava crack and end up with a broken leg because they panic.

Besides, when sheep are on lush grass, or when they are having problems with a parasite load, their feces are not always nice round individual pellets. Especially at night, manure piles can be clumps, which won't drop through a slatted floor. So since you'll have to go inside with a shovel or rake to clean up these manure clumps, I'd opt to go with a solid floor to prevent leg injuries (or a stressed or dead sheep because they were in a panic for hours before discovered).

Just my opinion because my own sheep are amazing at running into trouble.
 
thomas rubino
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Well Matthew ; I don't have any sheep ,just piggys. And I only have them from spring till  fall.
I was just offering my opinion. Wouldn't want to see any little guys slip thru.  A board added at birthing time would take care of that.
 
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Everything you did or didn't want to know about Shearing Shed Design, Sheep Storage and Movement:

NSW Department of Primary Industries

Note the section about 'Grating' (Flooring) ...

 
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