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farmOS: web-based farm management, planning, & record keeping

 
pollinator
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My friend just emailed me this. Go open source world! I haven't personally used it, but it looks interesting...

farmOS is a web-based application for farm management, planning, and record keeping.
It is built on Drupal, which makes it modular, extensible, and secure. Both Drupal and farmOS are licensed under the GNU General Public License, which means they are free and open source.

farmOS is under active development, but is still relatively new. The focus right now is laying a strong groundwork, so that others can more easily join in and contribute.

In this video by Chris Callahan at UVM Extension's Agricultural Engineering Program, Michael Stenta provides an overview of the motivations behind farmOS. Why he started the project, why he uses Drupal as the development framework and why it is open-source. Available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ATUEWrlDbWw

farmOS was featured in the GODAN Documentary Web Series: "OPEN FARMS", available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/bCOqg5iH6fM


   SOURCE: https://farmos.org/
farmOS.org-logo.png
[Thumbnail for farmOS.org-logo.png]
farmOS, farmOS.org logo
 
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Loxley, we have been looking at farmOS for a couple of years and eventually launched our slightly modified version here, if you are interested uname guest pw 123456789 https://perma-ledger.com/
 
pollinator
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Pretty cool for those with large properties. I could also see it being useful for consultants and project managers that do work in multiple locations. It's too bad the government won't let us have the same level of GPS accuracy and coverage as they have. The National Forest employees can come out and find a corner of federal land within an inch but a handheld GPS or cell phone is lucky to get within 10-20 feet for me, if I can catch that many satellites at one time.

If we had fedgov's GPS, FarmOS would be useful even for small places like this. I've got a little valley that, at it's steepest, is too steep to walk up in a few spots but USGS topo maps makes it look like a gentle dip. There's so many trees here that google earth satellite view  doesn't even show much terrain.

I'll be getting a transit to mark out some contour lines for earthworks and I may just map out the whole property with it. In winter, when all the leaves have fallen, if I stand in the right spot, I can see every sq ft of this place which makes it easy to visualize and locate things. If I had the 1000+ acre property across the road from me, FarmOS would be very useful. Meanwhile, I already use TurboCAD for scaled drawings and have one of the property in 2D. The only data I need to track is what's planted where in the garden and eventually, goat breeding. I'll be using Open Source Kintraks for that.
 
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John Pollard wrote:Pretty cool for those with large properties. I could also see it being useful for consultants and project managers that do work in multiple locations. It's too bad the government won't let us have the same level of GPS accuracy and coverage as they have. The National Forest employees can come out and find a corner of federal land within an inch but a handheld GPS or cell phone is lucky to get within 10-20 feet for me, if I can catch that many satellites at one time.

If we had fedgov's GPS, FarmOS would be useful even for small places like this. I've got a little valley that, at it's steepest, is too steep to walk up in a few spots but USGS topo maps makes it look like a gentle dip. There's so many trees here that google earth satellite view  doesn't even show much terrain.

I'll be getting a transit to mark out some contour lines for earthworks and I may just map out the whole property with it. In winter, when all the leaves have fallen, if I stand in the right spot, I can see every sq ft of this place which makes it easy to visualize and locate things. If I had the 1000+ acre property across the road from me, FarmOS would be very useful. Meanwhile, I already use TurboCAD for scaled drawings and have one of the property in 2D. The only data I need to track is what's planted where in the garden and eventually, goat breeding. I'll be using Open Source Kintraks for that.



consumer GPS is the same accuracy/precision as government GPS - it's one and the same signal.  Your cellphone is the limiting factor - you need one with dual frequency so it can receive the new & improved L5 band.

"During the 1990s, GPS quality was degraded by the United States government in a program called "Selective Availability"; this was discontinued in May 2000 by a law signed by President Bill Clinton.[6]

When selective availability was lifted in 2000, GPS had about a five-meter (16 ft) accuracy. The latest stage of accuracy enhancement uses the L5 band and is now fully deployed. GPS receivers released in 2018 that use the L5 band can have much higher accuracy, pinpointing to within 30 centimetres or 11.8 inches.[11][12]"
 
girl power ... turns out to be about a hundred watts. But they seriously don't like being connected to the grid. Tiny ad:
One million tiny ads for $25
https://permies.com/t/94684/million-tiny-ads
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