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Help with Learning Green Wizardry Skills  RSS feed

 
Jared Gardener
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Hello all,

     I'm in a bit of a rut at the moment. I have been trying to learn some green wizardry skills (as John Michael Greer calls them) but have found myself quite stuck by circumstance; although I planted my first no-till organic garden, started knitting, and am learning permaculture, I find that I can't do much of what I want to do because I currently live at my girlfriend's family's house until we move to our own place this December. I want to start a worm farm (but can't), I want to raise chickens (but can't), and the list goes on. I am happy that they let us garden but they aren't as sustainability-driven as the two of us are to let us do everything.



My next step is learning wild food foraging and maybe some basic woodworking and wood-carving, but I was wondering if anyone had any other recommendations for useful skills I could work on while not having land to play with.



Your help is much appreciated,

zym
 
Isaac Hill
gardener
Posts: 356
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Herbs! Goes hand in hand with wildcrafting and gets you a better intuitional understanding of plants, making your permaculture planting easier. You can learn what herbs are indigenous to your area, how to harvest them and so on, which wouldn't take much space.
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Fermentation. Learn to make sauerkraut
 
Jared Gardener
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Paleo Gardener wrote:
Fermentation. Learn to make sauerkraut


I appreciate the suggestion, but I've got the fermentation down. Check my username 

Hmmm herbs. I'll have to look into that. Thanks. Any other suggestions?
 
jacque greenleaf
pollinator
Posts: 489
Location: Burton, WA (USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 5) - old hippie heaven
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1) Start a rubbermaid worm bin - when it comes time to start a real worm farm, you'll have some valuable experience. You don't say where you are, but if your inlaws object to a worm bin in the house, you can stash it in the garage in most climates.

2) Lots of plants will grow in containers, and the experience will come in handy. Looking at decorative plants pleases most people.

3) Is there a patio or deck where you could put up a cold frame or small greenhouse?

4) Besides basic carpentry, learn soldering.

5) Look for local courses in plant propagation, or any subject that applies.

6) Research green homebuilding techniques, and draw many house plans.

7) Get this book - http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/fresh_food_from_small_spaces:paperback - and try something.

Now is a very good time to learn how to can. Everybody likes pickles, jam, relish...Tons of books out there, and the equipment for water bath canning is cheap.
 
Leila Rich
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Is it philosophical, aesthetic, ownership issues your girlfriend's folks, or more that they see extra work for themselves in your ideas?
The worry that there'll be extra labour's a pretty big deal for people if they don't 'get' what you're on about, especially if you're moving soonish and potentially leaving them with systems they don't understand or like.
It sounds like portability could be the key...
If the issues are more along the lines of philosophical, aesthetic, ownership, are there any permaculture/organic community gardens in your area? If so, there could be loads of great spin-offs, not least finding a community that 'gets' you!
 
Isaac Hill
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Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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FermenterZym wrote:

Hmmm herbs. I'll have to look into that. Thanks. Any other suggestions?


It depends on your locale! Get a good field guide and see what you can find, you'll be surprised. I found St. Johnswort, Self-Heal, Ground Ivy, Plantain, Dock (Rumex), Burdock, and Chameleon Plant all within ten feet of my porch.
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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FermenterZym wrote:
I appreciate the suggestion, but I've got the fermentation down. Check my username 

Hmmm herbs. I'll have to look into that. Thanks. Any other suggestions?


Woops! I guess I need to be a bit more observant. 
 
220 hours of permaculture video, freaky cheap! http://kck.st/2q6Ycay.
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