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SoCal seed mixtures for start-up

 
                                
Posts: 7
Location: Lakeside, CA
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So I'm going to have down time coming up this month to get into some of the big projects for our space...

The largest section of our property I will be putting in two 2-3 long swales and making the berms into hugel-beds. I will also be constructing rows of hugel-beds similar to this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nielscorfield/2670902826/sizes/l/

I'll probably embark on some wide-scale mulching/sheet mulching to get rid of the grasses that are currently in control back there.

My question:
Can anyone help to suggest a seed mixture to toss out and about to get this going in the right direction? Suggestions on ground covers, etc. Would love for the majority of it to be edible as well. We have planted a lot of fruit trees (some are N fixers) but they are still only a few feet high at most, so there is little no shade in the majority of the property.

I have a good idea of some of the veggies I will planting in the hugel beds and over some areas (greens, beets, carrots, tomatoes, etc.) but what about some flowers, alfalfa, etc?

Any help is greatly appreciated.
 
Kirk Hutchison
Posts: 418
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Clover, California Poppies, Borage, Zinnias. Anything that attracts beneficial insects.
 
Kirk Hutchison
Posts: 418
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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In the cool damp areas you can grow more tender herbs.
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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What is your soil like, dustbin?  I have soil on the alkaline side.  I've had the most success in our Mediterranean climate with lucerne (alfalfa), borage, red clover, and broad beans.  These all grow fairly vigorously and can be cut to make space for annuals while also improving the soil.
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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Also sunflowers go well, though probably not the best time of year for it in your part of the world

Now is a good time to establish perennials as they can get a head start over winter before the scorching heat of next summer, so minimal maintenance and watering work for you.
 
                                          
Posts: 27
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http://www.sarep.ucdavis.edu/cgi-bin/ccrop.EXE This is a list of cover crops, lots of them work well in the area. Also what kind of plants are already growing on the site?
 
hannah ransom
Posts: 81
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Thank you for the info and suggestions! Starting to put together some seed mixtures for the hugel beds.

Our soil hasn't been tested so I don't know the exact specifics... it is super hard, dry, and we believe there is a lot of granite in it.

(Btw, this is dustbin. I forgot to log out of my wife's account lol)
 
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