Danny Carm

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since Jul 15, 2012
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Recent posts by Danny Carm

Matthew Sargent wrote:Awesome I was thinking that they should fit in but as I mentioned the text I had read made it sound like you need a laboratory to be successful. Thanks!



Lab type stuff is really fun, but by no means necessary. Low tech methods are easy and effective, you just have to basically use high inoculation rates to help the fungus out-compete other things that might want to live on the substrate.
6 years ago
That's really strange that that was what you've read because log cultivation is actually the norm for most mushroom farming operations. You do get the most bang for your buck using logs because they are very nutrient dense compared to straw or some other substrate that you might use in a growbag. If you have land with a good supply of timber, it's even better since you don't have to pay for wood. on the other hand, you usually have to wait a year or two before they'll fruit, depending on which species you're growing (and not all species are suitable for log culture), but they should also fruit for a good 4-6 years once they do start from what I've heard.

Mushrooms really aren't too hard though, to be honest and log culture isn't the only good way to grow them. You can get all high tech and isolate strains using agar which is fun but not really necessary unless you're going for very specific traits. You can just as easily pour a spore slurry of oysters or king stropharia over some wood chips and keep them moist and you'll probably get nice sized flushes. If you have chickens or goats or some other type of animal, you can plant stropharia near where they are kept and they will clean up a lot of the bacteria that is in the animal feces and you'll also get mushrooms out of it. Basically you can inoculate any wooded/mulched path in your garden with some type of mushroom or another, and as long as it's kept moist and shaded there's a good chance you'll get mushrooms. They're seriously underutilized in permaculture, honestly. They're easy, fast, fun, they are great remediators, many form beneficial associations with plants (elm oysters do well in gardens, especially with brassicas), and they're really good to eat.
6 years ago
I don't have any answer to your question but just a heads up about growing apples from seed; it's kind of complicated but essentially apple genetics are weird and very diverse and you won't get the same type of apples from a seed as the tree that the seed came from. Like you won't get a Granny Smith-producing apple tree if you plant a seed from a Granny Smith apple. You will need to buy rootstocks of desirable trees (rootstocks decide the heigh of the tree, resistance to certain diseases and a few other things) and you'll have to graft to those rootstocks the "scion" (a piece of wood from a tree that produces the type of apples you want to get).

Apples are stupid but grafting is fun and a really cool skill to learn. You can still grow apples from trees but just know that they will taste bad. If you just want to grow a tree from seed though, and aren't concerned about the actual fruit though, then you have nothing to worry about.
6 years ago
These are not hallucinogenic. Like someone already said, if you're wondering for another time, look for blue bruising and a dark purple spore print. Be safe, friend.
6 years ago
Have you though about grafting some kind of good-for-eating apple onto it? I'm not very knowledgable about grafting but maybe a bark graft would work?

Or if you don't want to graft onto it, you can at least use it for clonal rootstock. Cut the tree in the winter (might be too late already depending on where you live) and then when it warms up, lots of little shoots of nice, straight wood will grow from around the trunk. From my understanding, growing clonal rootstock is just like coppicing. And then you dig up the shoots later on for use as rootstock.
6 years ago
Hey! My name's Danny, I'm from Chicago. I just followed you on tumblr (upthapermiepunx), your farm looks awesome! I was looking at wwoofing over the summer anyway and you guys aren't too far off so it sounds great but I'm also going to school and working and possibly moving within the year (it's still kind of up in the air) so everything is kind of complicated right now. But I just wanted to say your tumblr is rad and you guys seem like a lot of fun and I'll definitely keep you guys in mind if I end up being free this summer and even if not best of luck with everything. The world needs more farming punks.

Jay Shinn wrote:Read Me!

http://fungi.com/pdf/articles/Fungi_Perfecti_Phase_I_Report.pdf



I actually saw that a few days ago! It's awesome that they were able to do such an in depth experiment.

I kinda forgot about this thread but I've been getting back into mycology and finally got around to reading Mycelium Running I just had a few more questions. For your system you took to burning man, what strain of mushroom were you using? And how do you keep a fully colonized bunch of straw from fruiting? Especially if you're regularly running water through it? I know they like sunlight to help them know it's time to fruit, but from what I've heard, it's not 100% necessary. Did you end up with mushrooms in your filter?


ALSO, for everyone in this thread, there's an awesome youtube channel/website called Radical Mycology (http://www.youtube.com/user/radmycology) with a lot of excellent content for growing mushrooms for mycoremediation. I just ran across it the other day, hopefully you guys might find it useful and interesting.
6 years ago
Ahh yes, that definitely throws a wrench in my plan. Oops.
7 years ago
I've never built a rocket stove or done any smithing so I really have no idea if it's possible, but I think it would be pretty easy to build a TLUD gasifier to make charcoal cleanly and efficiently (and you can cook on it so you get more uses out of it) and then use the charcoal that you get out of that in a rocket stove set up to get a really hot fire going. I know that's an extra step, but I think getting a hot enough fire to use as a forge by just using wood would be kinda hard.

I couldn't find anything exactly like what you're looking for, but here are some videos that might help you come up with something.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txSD9i0R1Hs (making charcoal indoors using a rocket stove)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYDlaBFk2L8 (Charcoal making using a TLUD)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xA9nBqxPmY&list=FLA2xPFL8p_9wO8Iuwvv_pbA&index=1 (a small, portable forge). I think if you used one of the two methods in the other videos to make charcoal and then used that along with this, you could have something good. If you adapted this into "rocket forge" you could probably get away with not having to use/make very much charcoal at all).

Best of luck, this sounds really cool!

7 years ago
So I've been watching lots of videos on rocket mass heaters and noticed that quite a few people have them installed in their greenhouses which I think is really cool, and it got me thinking; Since the exhaust is mostly water vapor, why let it go to waste by sending it outside? Would it be feasible to maybe have some kind of valve that you can turn to either a) let the vapor out like you normally would or b) have the water vapor come back inside the greenhouse to increase humidity if you wanted to grow more tropical-type plants? I guess if the exhaust isn't 100% water vapor, then you might be letting a tiny bit of smoke back in, but that's probably no worse than having a conventional wood burning fireplace in your house, right? If you used a plastic pipe (like PVC) for the pipe that comes back into the greenhouse, you wouldn't have to worry about the water vapor condensing and rusting the pipe, either.

So what do you think? Does it sound possible, or am I missing something?
7 years ago