Judy Bowman

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since Feb 13, 2013
We have been homesteading for more than 20 years and lived off-grid for 8. We recently downsized from 40 acres to 2 acres in the much drier southwest corner of Oklahoma. We are veterans and are committed to a simple Christian lifestyle. We raise rabbits, pigs and chickens and have worn the cover off the Permaculture Handbook, still learning how to piece it all together.
Southwest Oklahoma, southern Greer County, Zone 7a
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Recent posts by Judy Bowman

Would you be interested in playing around on 40 acres in Garvin County?
4 weeks ago

denise ra wrote:How do these systems work in winter? I'm in Western Oklahoma and everything goes dormant in the winter when it can be pretty cold. Also, what about freezing? I don't think I can just attach a hose to the outside of my wall as I know it will freeze in winter. I'm also planning on not being here sometimes for months at a time, so what happens to reed beds and plants and trees when there's no water coming out of the house? Also, for those of you with dishwashers what are you using for dish soap?



Denise, my experience in south central Oklahoma:  Lived in an off-grid home. Greywater from the kitchen sink (the only drain in the house) was directed straight to an Hugulkulture bed under a tree. I was able to grow awesome shade loving plants there.  It would freeze periodically, not often, only when it was really bitter.  I believe a bit more decline in the pipe would have helped.  Years before, in southwestern Oklahoma, all the graywater from an on grid home went to a rock filled pit with no problem.  The pipe was underground and I think in the western part of the state, with our winds, that's the best bet.  We're back in far southwest Oklahoma now, in an on-grid home.  Would love to do a graywater diversion, but the plumbing is under the slab and I haven't taken the time to ponder how best to make it work.

So, yes, I think you could make it work with some thought and maybe a false start or two.
4 weeks ago
Wayne, that would be awesome.  I'm thinking they fruit late spring to early summer.  If there's anything that grows here in southwest Oklahoma that might be useful to you I'd be happy to swap.
1 year ago
I was born and raised in southwest Oklahoma and recently moved back after 20 years in the much wetter south central area.  There aren't a lot of persimmons here, I remember a few from when I was a kid.  My aunt transplanted wild grapes from a creek site to her dry, tightland garden more than 60 years ago and did well with those.  Sand plums are the go-to wild fruit out here.  It looks like we might have a crop this year.  Last year they perished in a late freeze.  We used to be able to find blackberries in the shelter belts, but a lot of those are gone now.  Prickly Pear fruit is an option.  Also there are things that can be done with mesquite.  Mulberry is a good choice as well.  My aunt that had the wild grapes also grew figs.  I've planted a Chicago Hardy and am anxious to see how it does.  There were trifoliate oranges for years around the local library and I plan to plant some of those as well.  I've also seen pomegranate grow and produce here. There are some oaks that will grow.  In the sand shinnery oak is easy to find, though it's a spreading bush and not a tree.  It does produce acorns, though.
1 year ago
I saw where someone had agarita berries. I would trade my only child for some!
1 year ago
We use a sawdust toilet so have to keep a can of cover material. In a conventional outhouse it doesn't hurt to keep some lime or wood ashes to dump in and help keep odors down. We also keep hand sanitizer and a container of cleaning wipes for quick seat wipedowns. Also, a solar light for night visits.
4 years ago
Crystal,

On the one hand, cattle producers do it all the time. On the other hand, having raised sheep and goats both ways, I wouldn't want to go back to not having the livestock right out the back door. We have much better outcomes (less illness, fewer kidding problems/losses and fewer predator losses) from being able to interact with the animals several times daily. I believe there's quite a bit more interaction even on a subconscious level. That's not to say you couldn't do it. The only way to know for sure (as is the case with most homesteading ideas) if it would work for you is to give it a try. Maybe with a minimum number of one species to start?

Don't ever let anyone tell you that something can't be done or that what's working for you is wrong. 😉
4 years ago

Tyler Ludens wrote:Come on down, steve!

David, the deer in the top photo are the native Whitetail, Odocoileus virginianus; the stag in the lower photo is a non-native Axis or Chital, Axis axis.



Tyler, have the Axis gotten off the game ranches down there? If so, can you hunt them? During regular season? Tags? It's a beautiful animal.
4 years ago
This is what we use for 2 people in Oklahoma, zone 7, temperature lows between 5 and 20F. We separate probably 75% of the urine. We don't use a diverter but keep a separate urine bucket that we've just gotten used to using. No strict rules about urine separation. Each barrel fills up in 4 to 6 weeks, depending on how much company we've had. After 4 to 6 months of composting in the barrels we dump into an open compost area for a few months before using. When it's warm we get lots of soldier fly larvae in the barrels which really helps stuff break down.

five black plastic barrels

Here's a link if the picture doesn't display.

webpage
4 years ago