John Todd

+ Follow
since May 02, 2016
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
4
In last 30 days
1
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
30
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
37
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by John Todd

I tell you from experience ... all those things can be cooked in a pressure cooker.  As for the foaming, put some oil in there before you lock it down.

And there have been times I've forgotten the oil, and when I released pressure, hot foamy "bean water" spewed out and ran down the sides.  A bit of a mess, not something to repeat, but not dangerous.  Just be sure to clean the lid/valves afterwards.

EDIT:  And never overfill it!  Some things do expand, so cook in smaller batches.
10 months ago
This is very interesting.  Can you tell me more of what you've learned or done since posting this?
10 months ago
I got mine at Scythe Supply.  Never an issue, and always friendly customer support.  I bought one of the outfits.

A ditch blade sounds right for what you are saying, but keep in mind, nothing ever works in real life as good as it does in our heads.  That's why I started with a ditch blade 3 years ago, but this year I added a bush blade for the heavier stuff.  The lighter stuff was heavier than I thought.

And yes, they absolutely must be made to his measurements.

Hope this helps!
-Johntodd
10 months ago
This thread keeps getting awesomer and awesomer! 

Keep'em coming, folks!

Let's start throwing in links to pages/articles/videos on non-canning preservation.  We could turn this thread into a mini library.

Thanks!
-John

11 months ago
Wow! SO many videos, and I can't seem to find the one I want.  Anyway you could throw us a link to it?
11 months ago
This is all good stuff!  Thanks, and keep it coming!
11 months ago
Oh how our gardens grow!

So much so that we can't process all that food without spending entire days-after-days running the canner, dehydrator, smoker, etc.  Even then, it's coming in faster than we can process and we're losing a lot of it.

I need a faster, easier method of preserving lots of food.  It's your typical garden veggies type of produce.

Perhaps my question is not so much about method but workflow?  Does anyone have a "food shop" that gets cranked up when the garden produce starts coming in?

I have an entire room I can devote to this, and some very large spaces outdoors.  Any equipment used outdoors would have to stay outdoors for many days/weeks until the season winds down.

I don't know quite what I am asking?  I know what I want: to efficiently preserve all that garden produce.  But geez, we can only run 2 canner loads a day.  We easily need to run the equivalent of 20 canner loads a day for several days/ couple of weeks at a time.   Dehydrators?  I'm thinking of building a humongous one for outdoors use and run it off an extension cord.

What to do?  Youtube videos?  Personal pages showing what others have done?

If there is no readily available solution, then let's troubleshoot/dialogue on this.  A home preservation room.  In springtime it would be a sprouting/transplant room! 

Thanks!
-John
11 months ago
As a follow-up to the follow-up:

This year's garden is winding down.  There was definitely a problem with weeds this year, but only in certain patches of the garden.  I remember the soil in those patches being brown, rather than the good-looking soil we typically have around here.

So I looked it up, and it turns out the soil was starving for nutrition and was eating the hay like candy.  Therefore, it left gaps for weeds to emerge.

So let me repeat my previous statement:  Put a metric booty-load of hay on in the Autumn so the soil can have a feast.  Then more in Spring.

I am doubling up my hay order for this, and I expect to for at least two more years after 2018.

Thanks!
-John
11 months ago
As a follow-up:

The roots came bone dry.  The instructions said to gently wet them once a week until planting and keep them refridgerated.

The weather warmed, and I planted them March 25th.  They came up, and I got 48 out of 50 very hardy beautiful first-year asparagus.

Thanks!
-John
11 months ago