Norma Guy

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since Dec 27, 2016
Norma likes ...
chicken food preservation forest garden
Ontario, climate zone 3a
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Recent posts by Norma Guy

Black knot is endemic on our land and mostly grows on the pin cherry trees, which make up about 30% of the species mix in certain areas of the property, and nearly every one I've seen has black knot.  In our clearing I have asked my husband to leave any trees that he sees that don't have black knot in case it's because they have developed resistance.  I'm really worried about when we start bringing in other susceptible food forest species how we will ever prevent it because it is so prevalent.  In choosing trees, we will have to look for strains that are listed as black knot resistant.  My dad had a few fruit trees (plum, cherry, peach) and wasn't vigilant in removing the black knot and almost all stopped producing and died.

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/english/tender/diseases-and-disorders/blackknot.html

(edited to add link)
1 week ago
We have seen this for the last couple of years in Northern Ontario.  We watched a tractor lay it out over the fields, and my husband remarked wondering whether it was re-usable or would all go to the garbage after.  I guess this highlights the difference between "permaculture" and "organic farming", where we might tend to think of organics being a part of permaculture this shows it certainly isn't, as far as the marketable label "organic" is concerned.
1 week ago
This would be illegal where I live :P Unless you also had a trigger lock device on it, and your ammunition was stored separately and locked as well.
1 month ago
I use tooth powder from a Mommypotamous recipe.  It calls for calcium bentonite clay, baking soda, sea salt, cloves, cinnamon, mint, stevia and charcoal.  Been using this for over two years.  I use a mortar and pestle to grind dried mint leaves and sea salt together to make them both fine enough for the powder, and then put it through a seive, discarding the bits that won't go through (they get under your gums if you brush with them).  Everything comes from the bulk barn except the calcium bentonite clay, I got it on Amazon because it's so expensive in stores here.  I double the recipe, dropping all the ingredients into a mason jar, and then just shake it until it's mixed.  I sometimes add a couple drops of mint essential oil into the jar before I shake it.
https://mommypotamus.com/tooth-powder-recipe/

I also exclusively use her coconut oil soap recipe for hands, face, body and hair, and rinse my hair with apple cider vinegar when it needs it.

I think the key to oral health is in diligence, and avoidance of added sugar, not fluoride.  As a person who suffers from chronic dry mouth and in early menopause, the gums aren't what they used to be.  It's important to stay hydrated.  Once in a while when my gums are tetchy I rinse with some diluted hydrogen peroxide, and floss, floss, floss!  If I had taken better care in my younger years I wouldn't have some of the problems I do now.

On a side-note, non-genetic Alzheimers has now been solidly linked to the bacteria porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes gum disease.
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191814-we-may-finally-know-what-causes-alzheimers-and-how-to-stop-it/

1 month ago
I'm too cheap to go to hairdressers.  When my hair is long, I trim the bad ends so I can get a brush through it, and if it's uneven no one will notice because it's usually twisted up anyway to keep it out of my face.  When I'm sick of it, I cut it off (my husband has a braid in his dresser drawer from two years ago).  I do my husband's hair, and he's learning to do his own now and I just come in after and make some adjustments.  It feels good to have one more thing in my life that I don't need to rely on others, or money, to get done! :D
1 month ago
Thank you, I guess I only read up to that post and got over excited XD
1 month ago
Dr RedHawk, could you tell me the scientific name of the beauty bush?  I'm not familiar with this plant, and I'm looking for alternative repellents.  I want to make sure I'm not confusing it with something with the same common name.

There is permethrin-treated clothing becoming more and more popular, it only this year became legal in the Canadian marketplace, but it kills indiscriminately and is an aquatic toxin so I won't buy it.  I have tried so-called mosquito proof clothing and have had some success not getting eaten alive with this tight cotton weave. I have tried lavender, oil and alcohol in a spray bottle as well.
1 month ago
Last year I went out for a pee in the middle of the night, and found some glowing fungus.  Glad I  didn't take my flashlight or I would have missed it!  It was growing on the cut ends of some suckers I had cut off a while before.  I've been trying to find a specimen ever since, I looked it up later and found that the glowing inoculated wood is called fox fire, and grows across the globe at our latitude, along with several other glowing species.  I had no idea glowing fungus existed before that.  In reading about it, I found a story from some cottagers who had laid woodchips along a path and when the fungus grew on the woodchips their path glowed.
1 month ago
I wonder if it would be helpful to look at specific incidence in research done in countries where heavy industrial development is more recent than advanced western medical intervention, if there is such a place that would be a good example?
2 months ago
The important factor would be the ability to diagnose cancers where they were previously unrecognized.  Like many diseases and disorders which have exponentially increasing rates of diagnosis, the difference may be in diagnostic ability and not necessarily actual incidence.  It's hard to say what the actual incidence was 100 years ago for many cancers, when diagnostic tools and treatments were nonexistent or vastly inaccessible, in comparison to today when technology has advanced and many places have publicly funded healthcare services.  There are probably research estimates made in vastly differing expert opinions, which would be challenged without recorded evidence.  Intuitively we have massively higher rates of exposure to carcinogens that weren't invented in 1860, anyway, so even the non expert opinion would lean toward increased risk without evidence of incidence, if that's part of the research goal.  The cumulative biological and environmental chemical load is terrifying, and that might be measured archaeologically in the case of some chemicals.
2 months ago