Aaron Tusmith

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since Jan 08, 2018
Aaron likes ...
greening the desert
Western Idaho
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Recent posts by Aaron Tusmith

I have thought about this same problem and what came to mind is the super slow and tedious method of heating a metal rod and grinding it into the pole and essentially burning it out, and repeating the process (would take forever). Also I thought of using a metal rod such as a piece of rebar and fashioning a sort of tooth on the end with a grinder or something to make an extra long bore tool. This could theoretically be chucked in to a drill and used that way (never tried it). Or you could perhaps just weld the drill bit onto the tip of a piece of rebar and use that either with some sort of power tool of even by hand if you could mount it and get good enough torque and leverage. Good luck!
1 week ago
I was planning on using turmeric as a color additive for an interior earthen plaster:)
1 week ago
Just an idea, I did a bit of searching around the forums and the web and did not find any examples of these griddle bricks used as an insulating material in construction of an rmh. Apparently pumice melts between 1600 and 1800 F so it can withstand decent temperatures. I am not sure however that these figures would mean the same for these typical bricks used for cleaning flat-top grills. They can be ordered from most restaurant suppliers and online you can get a case of 12 for about 15 bucks. The big ones are 3 1/2 x 4 x 8 inches but one appealing feature is that they can be easily cut, ground or otherwise shaped into any dimension. From this they could be packed together very tightly without the necessity of a slip or mortar in between them. I have read in other threads that the R value of pumice is poorer than rock wool, perlite/slip or vermiculite but those comparisons seemed to be to the loose-fill pumice one might find at a nursery. There might be an advantage in the tight uniform structure of this particular material.

They could be easily employed in insulating the feed tube and the burn chamber, outside of the fire brick interior but I am not so sure about the heat riser. Perhaps with a more heat tolerant material on the interior of the core.
Anyway, I just thought they might be useful in this sort of application and this is where I come to find out whether or not my ideas would be a waste of money and time! Thanks!
1 week ago


One of the reasons I love Idaho
1 month ago
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Ii7saqq9AD8dC0uFg3SonxACm6l0_Xlx/view?usp=sharing

Here is a visual aid I hope it helps. At this point I am working on what to fill the cans with, for best insulating properties as well as managing moisture accumulation. I plan on incorporating some earthen plaster/lath application on the interior (open side). Prior to filling the gaps between the cans I plan on using a general application of clear rust-oleum from a spray can. The cans will be independent of the load bearing structure.
1 month ago
This canal is diverted from a river and used for hydroelectric. A giant inflatable dam diverts water into the canal, and when it accumulates too much sand, the dam is deflated and heavy machinery goes in to remove the material, it is quite the maintenance project. Upstream lies about a couple hundred miles of river to the headwaters in the mountains. I expect the ick in the sand to consist primarily of runoff from agricultural (alfalfa) and livestock (cattle). You do bring up a good point though, I should get a sample of this sand tested before I bring any on the property.
1 month ago
Real quick, I can arrange for the local canal maintenance dept. to dump truck loads of sand onto the property for free. With the overall intention of creating a sound-break from the traffic on the highway, my question is if covering a hugel with sand is a waste of time and a definite no-no? Other than that I assume it would just be a much slower working process, which is still ok with me. Since my main hope is to create an enormous barrier, I think in the long run it would be worth my time to arrange this, any thoughts? There are several sawmills in the area and I am sure they could contribute to the primary pile of biomass but the dominant material in this enormous mound would be sand. Thanks!
1 month ago
If there are any dams or canal systems, or any water ways that are managed in your area you might try talking to them and see where they take the accumulated sands, In my area the canal that runs through town fills up with sand and needs to be emptied by back hoe and they are always looking for a place to put it.
1 month ago
Along the same lines my idea was to leave broken down cardboard boxes out in the rain and roll them up and tie them as well. Again, cardboard is one of those materials that folks can easily take to recycling, even in a lot of small towns. But, it still is widely available, usually free and burns quite well.
1 month ago
I'm imagining it would be best to clean and process the plastic into shreds or something before installing? Thanks for your input, I am trying to find the best waste insulation ideas that wont rot or mold.
1 month ago