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Lizabeth Davis

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since Nov 25, 2010
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Recent posts by Lizabeth Davis

I am planting comfrey as well as fodder trees for my sheep, goats and other livestock. The comfrey grows the fastest obviously and will be available for feed next year. From what I have read, common comfrey has the least toxins. And sheep are the most resistant to those toxins. Bocking 4 is the next least toxic after the common variety.

My question is, I would really like to use comfrey next year in place of the grain/alfalfa ration for my sheep. I have planted primarily common comfrey so far, but will likely need to plant the bocking 4 to fill in the rest of my comfrey patches because of difficulty of finding more common plants. Does anyone here feed their sheep or goats comfrey in place of grain? Does anyone know of a safe amount of comfrey that can be safely fed to the sheep? And when people talk about safe proportions of diet,, are they referring to calories or bulk?
I am planning to build three new systems raising tilapia. I am planning on using solar powered pumps. But I am also thinking of building windmill water pumps that will work simultaneously and as back-up. The big problem is when there is no wind. But I could have water tanks above and below the fish tanks and have a windmill pump lift water to the upper tank from the very bottom tank that could then be released through the grow bed, then the fish tank and on to the lower tank when there is a lack of wind. It is rarely still at our location for very long. At this point, this would be an experiment. But if it works, then it could be an alternative.
4 years ago
Did you ever finish your project? I got the cob in around the woodstove and it is working great. There was minimal cracking. I have learned that it is better to fire the woodstove while the cob is still damp so my fears were undfounded. I still need to cob above the stove around the chimney (want to wrap it with copper tubing for water heating first). But that will wait until the weather begins to warm. Anyway, I am very pleased with my project and the difference it made for our comfort levels (definitely moderated the temperature swing). Hope it worked out for you too.
5 years ago
cob
I am presently surrounding our wood stove with cob and have found a few lovely examples of it online. I am also following the technique of building cob bread ovens. The layer closest to the heat shouldn't contain organic matter. But then an insulative layer comes after that with plenty of straw. It seems like if done correctly, major cracking shouldn't be a problem. I was worried about doing this so close to the heating season. I would have preferred it to have had a chance to thoroughly dry before lighting a fire. That likely won't be the case. But they seem to start fires in the cob pizza ovens right away and don't have a lot of problems. I hope that will the case for me. If not, I plan to fill the cracks over time.

http://www.lowimpactliving.com/blog/2009/04/10/the-most-beautiful-green-home-building-construction-project-ever/
5 years ago
cob
Right now, alfalfa makes the base of our goats' feed and I really want to move away from it and grow our own feed. It is way too expensive and is a strong weak link in our effort to become more self-sufficient. What high protein feeds do you all, who grow your own feed, recommend? We live in Texas and alfalfa does not grow well here. I plan to plant honey locust, black locust and honey mesquite for high protein feed. But I need some good roughage plants that are perennial and require minimal maintenance that can also hopefully be harvested and stored for the winter months. Or if there is something that remains green during the winter that they can feed on, that would be good too.



Thank you.
8 years ago
I used a persimmon and orange recipe (includes orange juice and finely grated orange peel). The basic flavor, particularly in the good batch, was very good. I cut out the seeds by hand, then used a "Roma" food mill to separate the skins from the flesh.

http://www.lehmans.com/store/Kitchen___Canning_and_Preserving___Food_Mills___Roma__Food_Mill___070801?Args=
8 years ago
I made wild persimmon jam this year and tried to be very careful as well, using only the softest, mushiest fruit. One batch turned out fine, but a think there was a less than ideal fruit in the second batch. It had that chalky quality. I am convinced now, that to make good persimmon jam, I will need to taste a micro piece of each fruit before using it. One less than fully ripe fruit can mess up the whole batch. And sometimes, even what seems like a fully ripe and softened fruit can still have that chalky quality. I did notice that with the fruit I picked.



8 years ago