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Alternative to sheetrock  RSS feed

 
vicke adams
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I have  a pole barn. I am building my living quarters in part of it and leaving the rest of it for a stable for my goats and a workshop. I have been trying to figure out something cost effective with which to cover the walls. I have it framed and pretty well insulated, so the main thing is just to have a covering to protect the insulation and cover wiring, etc. I know that one of the advantages of sheetrock is that it is somewhat fire-retardant. As I am all by myself a long ways away from anybody else and miles from a firestation, have no well (I have a rainwater collection system) and no other source of water for fire-fighting, I am a little concerned about not creating a fire risk. Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Vicke
NE Oklahoma homestead
caretaker of the farm, dogs, goats, cats and wonderful RIR laying hens
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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Sheetrock does have some fire-retardant properties, but it's a little tricky for one person to install alone unless you have both experience and some special equipment (the equipment can be rented, usually -- you'll need a lift to get the sheetrock up for the ceiling).  Personally, I'd just as soon put wood boards on the walls and ceiling.  They don't need to be painted (I've been painting here today, and wishing it wasn't necessary, LOL!), look nice (in my own home, I would treat the wood in such a way that it wouldn't darken too much, as I like light in my living areas), and are much easier to put up by yourself than 4' X 8' pieces of sheetrock!

Alternatively, you could put up lathe and do plaster.  It would be more work.  Don't know how the price compares, but I suspect when hiring it done, labor is most of the cost.  Well done plaster looks really nice, and would be at least as fireproof as sheetrock.  Needs white-washed or painted, though.

Kathleen
 
Joseph Fields
Posts: 174
Location: Berea, Kentucky
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I bought a drywall lift. Best 130$ I have ever spent.
 
Kathleen Sanderson
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Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
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I didn't realize that they were so inexpensive, relatively speaking.  That would be well-worth the price, especially if you had more than just a few sheets (small house) to put up.  You could probably sell the thing when you were done with it, too.

Kathleen
 
vicke adams
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So, are you suggesting that sheetrock is the best way to go? No green alternatives?
 
Joseph Fields
Posts: 174
Location: Berea, Kentucky
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I also used my dry wall lift to put in my attic access. I had to rig it up with a tow strap. Worked like a charm.
 
                                                                    
Posts: 114
Location: Nashville, Tennessee, USA
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Papercrete on lath might work well.

Have a cheap day everyone !
 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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vicke wrote:
So, are you suggesting that sheetrock is the best way to go? No green alternatives?



There really doesn't appear to be anything wonderfully green to replace sheet rock.

I like the look of corrugated galvanized metal roofing on interior walls.  It is multifaceted and architecturally pleasing to me.      It can be easily recycled compared to sheet rock.    Doesn't need painting either!      Lightly reflects the color of other things in the room, so easy to decorate with.

An electric metal shear makes it fairly easy to work with.  Available at home depot or rental yards.    A few screws and some creative trim strips and you're done!
 
Rob Viglas
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you could try lathe and earthen plaster or maybe lathe and cob?
a clay based plaster can be colored easily and you may be able to harvest the clay on your site. lots of labor but well worth it!
 
                                
Posts: 98
Location: Eastern Colorado, USA
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You could use drywall instead of sheetrock. 
 
                                                                    
Posts: 114
Location: Nashville, Tennessee, USA
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I have read that these wall board products contain coal ash, aka fly ash.
There could be toxicity in them as a result.
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1091
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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Take a look at ferro cement or adobe fiber cement as a parge on. We have done both and been very pleased with them in our tiny cottage.
 
                                
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Campy in Nashville, Tennessee, USA wrote:
I have read that these wall board products contain coal ash, aka fly ash.
There could be toxicity in them as a result.



this is absolutely true.  spoke with a coal-fried power plant engineer in 2004 about their chimney scrubber project and he informed me that the scrubbed particles were going to be used to make sheetrock.
 
Danielle Favor
Posts: 17
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Vicke -- Dan Phillips is a great resource for non-conventional building materials -- using things that others throw away.  His website is http://www.phoenixcommotion.com/ ; He talks more about floors than walls, but maybe there's something there to inspire you.  Another resource is http://buildingscience.com/ ; Hope this helps!
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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i would use wood first and plaster it with earth. earth is pretty damn fire resistant.
 
Philip Kienholz
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Vicke: Whatever you use for a finish material, be use to use a vapour barrier on the warm side of the insulation. This will prevent the warm, moist air of the inside of the dwelling from penetrating through the insulation to where the temperature is cool enough that the water vapour condenses out of the air and forms liquid moisture--or frost--within the wall. Moisture within the wall will cause mold to form on any organic surface that can provide food for the mold, such as wood, cellulose, dirt in the insulation, etc. Seal the polyethylene vapour barrier to itself and at wall edges using acoustic sealant, which does not dry out and lose its adhesive quality, like red Tuck tape does. Lap the poly sheets 6" to each other and at wall edges. If the vapour barrier is continuous about the entire dwelling, it is called an air barrier, which reduces air infiltration and saves heat.
 
janette cormier
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time to spare and cheap = lathe and earth plaster (very fire retardant). little time and some money = wood panelling. you could recycle wood if you had time/access, too. large pallets are good for that.

 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
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wood paneling without sheet rock or plaster behind it creates a fire hazard. and will not pass code if your site will be inspected. how much of a concern this is depends on if you like candles and if you're scared of house fires
 
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World Domination Gardening 3-DVD set. Gardening with an excavator.
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