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planting grapes between driveway and fence - polyculture suggestions?

 
Posts: 66
Location: western slope of Oregon Cascades/Portland, OR
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I'm not sure if this is the best forum for this question, but since I'm in the city and it's a space issue, here goes: I'm planning to plant grapes in the foot or so of ground between the paved driveway and my neighbor's fence (I'll provide a structure not attached to the fence for them to grow on). What would be useful additions in that space to begin creating a polyculture? Lots of sun in this area.
 
Posts: 33
Location: Europe - CZ, Pannonian / continental zone
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purity chicken homestead
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Some perrenial herbs..
 
pollinator
Posts: 511
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9-10, 60" rain/yr,
84
hugelkultur dog duck
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Strawberries have done well at the feet of my grapes, at least for the first several years so far. I would agree with Jan, most italian or french herbs will likely do well and benefit the vines. If you have rich soil you could also do greens, which would benefit in summer from the vines' shade. Most plants with small, simple white or yellow flowers (arugula, brassicas, yarrow, queen annes lace etc), will attract beneficial insects to control pests. Tansy is an invasive to the nw but it also controls problematic nematodes. Near a driveway, planting on native american rootstock is beneficial to avoid phylloxera problems that plague european grapes' roots.
 
Anna Tennis
Posts: 66
Location: western slope of Oregon Cascades/Portland, OR
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Ben Zumeta wrote:Near a driveway, planting on native american rootstock is beneficial to avoid phylloxera problems that plague european grapes' roots.



Just checked out phylloxera on Wikipedia but am unsure why proximity to a driveway might mean greater risk.

Mediterranean herbs, yes, an obvious choice! Thanks for the reminder.
 
pollinator
Posts: 376
Location: San Diego, California
57
forest garden rabbit chicken food preservation building woodworking
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Clover is always a good choice for ground cover; I also like Alyssum(edible, and smells absolutely wonderful!)

Things to avoid(obvious, I know, but I just have to be thorough):

Root crops
Heavy feeders/water thirsty plants
Invasive Species
Other vining plants (again obvious, but some plants look like bushes or ground-cover, but only because they don't have anything to climb(like jasmine/asparagus fern, etc.))
 
Ben Zumeta
pollinator
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84
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Phylloxera is often transferred on the wheels of vehicles that drive anywhere around vineyards, like on a winery-vineyard tour that you have people taking all the time in the adjacent Willamette valley. Limiting vehicle traffic on vineyards is one of the key ways to control the introduction of phylloxera. I grow grapes near enough to a road to possibly get it transmitted, but I dont live near a major winegrowing area that is infested with it.
 
Anna Tennis
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Location: western slope of Oregon Cascades/Portland, OR
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Ben Zumeta wrote:Phylloxera is often transferred on the wheels of vehicles that drive anywhere around vineyards, like on a winery-vineyard tour that you have people taking all the time in the adjacent Willamette valley. Limiting vehicle traffic on vineyards is one of the key ways to control the introduction of phylloxera. I grow grapes near enough to a road to possibly get it transmitted, but I dont live near a major winegrowing area that is infested with it.



Thanks for explaining that
 
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