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Fluoresent orange fungi eating my dead tree stump. What should I do?

 
pollinator
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A freakishly fluorescent orange fungi has colonised the hard-wood tree stump of a hardwood tree I cut down a year ago.

Today I started picking at the wood at the centre and it's as brittle as paper. I effortlessly pulled half the tree stump out using my fingers. The parts the fungi haven't reached yet are still really hard.

My question is: what should I be doing? Should I pull the whole thing apart and use the fungi-colonised chips as a mulch, hoping that the fungi will spread? Should I leave it as it is?

By hollowing out the entire tree stump whose tap root goes very deep into the ground, I thought I can water it deeply in summer so the water leaches deep into the ground to feed my fruit trees and plants. I also want to avoid attracting termites (it's next to my apartment), and if the thick roots deteriorate fast then my new fruit trees planted right next to it will have more room for their roots to grow.
 
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Literally fluorescent? That's amazing, I would propogate it as a source of alternative lighting.

Haha okay probably not. I would just leave it alone and let it finish breaking down the tree stump. You are lucky it was there so you didn't have to use chemical stump remover or try to yank it out with a truck and some rope.

(Having looked it up, there are bioluminescent mushrooms but they all glow an eery green not a nice warm orange, so mushroom candles are probably not in the immediate future.)
 
gardener
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There are quite a few Orange fungi, can you either give a better description of what it looks like or better yet, a photo. I can probably identify the species with a photo a lot faster than with only a description.
Also where on planet earth are you located? that too is important information.

If you simply leave it alone, it will spread its spores and that is the ultimate gift to you.

This link takes you to an identification page that lists the 176 different orange fungus species
orange fungi page


Redhawk
 
pollinator
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I get a pink/orange fungus growing through my coffee ground-dominant compost, under the sink. I assumed that it is ambient, and that it will only help my compost and soil. I hope I am right.

-CK
 
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Last year I went out for a pee in the middle of the night, and found some glowing fungus.  Glad I  didn't take my flashlight or I would have missed it!  It was growing on the cut ends of some suckers I had cut off a while before.  I've been trying to find a specimen ever since, I looked it up later and found that the glowing inoculated wood is called fox fire, and grows across the globe at our latitude, along with several other glowing species.  I had no idea glowing fungus existed before that.  In reading about it, I found a story from some cottagers who had laid woodchips along a path and when the fungus grew on the woodchips their path glowed.
 
pioneer
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I've seen a lot of brown and white fungus that looks almost like a shelf on some oak and hickory stumps.  Glad nature is taking care of things and turning them into nutritious soil.
 
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