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Late start garden weed ID  RSS feed

 
Posts: 4
Location: Charlotte, NC
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I have been tied up finishing a house construction project all winter and never got around to preparing beds and adding compost before it got overrun. I can tell the things like the parsley, lemon balm and onions growing up from previous planting, but most of what I intentionally planted here last year were annuals. I am looking to get a summer crop going again and need help identifying what I should keep and what I should keep in check/eliminate.
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Lemon balm, onions and ...?
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Parsley and mostly the same ...?
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Something different taking over a L shaped bed
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Onions and same ...?
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Closer look at something different in L shaped bed
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Not sure what this is growing from under the parsley
 
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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The one in the last photo might be the dreaded Poison Hemlock:  https://www.kingcounty.gov/services/environment/animals-and-plants/noxious-weeds/weed-identification/poison-hemlock.aspx

or, if you're lucky, the innocuous Wild Carrot aka Queen Anne's Lace https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/wild_carrot.htm
 
Bryan Star
Posts: 4
Location: Charlotte, NC
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The last one had hairy stems which it says poison hemlock does not have.

Is the wild geranium a good ground cover between things? Clear it away from seed starts to keep competition down? Is it worth transplanting for ground covers elsewhere?
 
pollinator
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There's not much hope identifying your parsley squatter until it flowers, way too many things look very similar, I would say it is not carrot or parsnip (wild or otherwise).
 
pollinator
Posts: 587
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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Tyler Ludens wrote:The one in the last photo might be the dreaded Poison Hemlock:  https://www.kingcounty.gov/services/environment/animals-and-plants/noxious-weeds/weed-identification/poison-hemlock.aspx

or, if you're lucky, the innocuous Wild Carrot aka Queen Anne's Lace https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/wild_carrot.htm



One thing to remember about poison hemlock is that it tends to have reddish-purple coloring at the base of the stems and usually little reddish-purple spots around the lower parts of the stem as well. However, unless you are 200% sure it is not hemlock, don't even think about eating it. My husband once IDed "cow parsley" and said it was okay to eat it in the salad he just gathered. I wasn't convinced. I went out to look and discovered his cow parsley was the same plant that killed Socrates!!! I told him he was no longer in charge of gathering wild salads. :)

Also, it is just possible that you may be looking at a mature parsley plant. Parsley can get a lot bigger than most people think and will often sprout up tall like that just before bolting and producing seed. BE CAREFUL THOUGH!!!
 
Deb Stephens
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Could you get some close-up photos of the plant? I can see it generally, but for ID it would be better to have some shots of the leaves and stem as close as possible and not so blurry. I think someone suggested wild geranium but that is not what it is. Wild geranium is larger and has a kind of U-shaped gap where the stem comes down (making the leaf broader at that point)  while these radiate out more symmetrically all the way around a central stem. (At least that is what they appear to do -- as I said, it is hard to tell from these wide shots.)
 
Bryan Star
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Location: Charlotte, NC
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I noticed the blurriness when I got them on the big screen. I took them at dusk, so I will get some better close ups tomorrow and follow up. Thanks for the responses!
 
Bryan Star
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Location: Charlotte, NC
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Here are some better pictures. I am ready to start pulling this stuff back to open up space, but I want to know if any is worth keeping around or beneficial.
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main thing taking over
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other one prevalent in a different compost bed
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parsley squatter
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close up of parsley squatter
 
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Location: South Carolina 8a
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I am pretty sure your parsley squatter is just what parsley does on its second year as a biennial. It has bolted, and will soon flower and reseed if you allow it.
 
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I believe the groundcover may be thimbleweed or related.  I enjoy the patch I have growing in my backyard.  it is a somewhat aggressive but low height plant.  

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anemone_canadensis
https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ANCA8



Ther are several Anemone species that look similar.
 
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