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Role of hairy bittercress in landscape?

 
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Hello growie friends

I am curious to know if hairy bittercress has any accumulating properties, or fills a niche of some sort, or is a habitat for an insect of some kind. I understand that the presence of "weeds" are a signal, (deficiency, oversaturation, poor soil / too much of a nutrient), that Nature is doing some kind of repair, and was wondering if any of you know what hairy bittercress would be signaling about the soil or microclimate in which it appears.

I see from browsing the forums that it is edible, which is always good news.

I have found a large patch growing next to my driveway. The flowers were beautiful and I was glad to have them. I see now that their seeds like to explode everywhere -- it looks to be extremely prolific, which only worries me if it gets to my neighbor's yard and they are not a fan of this energetic little species.

(Not sure if this is the right forum category for this..)
 
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I skimmed a little information about it and it looks like it has a taproot and prefers moisture, so it is indicating the site is compacted and moist, which one can see is likely next to a driveway.
 
gardener
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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This is a pretty common plant all over the planet and it is considered a middle of the road accumulator plant when used for chop and drop.
The scientific name is  Cardamine hirsute, it usually springs up in the fall and grows well all winter long, providing decent bitter salad greens.
It is listed as a medicinal herb since it does have many uses as such.
Being in the brassica family bittercress has many health benefits.
It contains glucosinolates which are known to help remove carcinogens from the body.
It also contains, vitamin C, beta-carotine, and possibly lutein which is known to help reduce vision problems including cataracts.

It prefers steady mosture and it is considered one of the primary succession plants of nature.
This plant is very good at helping establish the microbiome and keeping it going over the cold months.

Redhawk
 
Mac Kugler
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Thank you Tyler and Bryant for sharing your knowledge. It feels great to know these things now about this plant.
 
My honeysuckle is blooming this year! Now to fertilize this tiny ad:
the permaculture bootcamp in winter
https://permies.com/t/149839/permaculture-projects/permaculture-bootcamp-winter
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