• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • James Freyr
  • Greg Martin
  • Dave Burton
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Dan Boone

Sweet potatoes in buckets, on trellis

 
Posts: 169
34
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,

I have seen a video (I think it was here) where someone had sweet potatoes on a trellis, in pots, the bottom of the roots in water buckets for ease of irrigation. Can anyone remember having seen this?
I want to try it out this year, but cannot remember how it was done...

Thanks
 
master steward
Posts: 2648
Location: USDA Zone 8a
667
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is not exactly what you are looking for though it might help:  http://fivegallonideas.com/growing-sweet-potatoes/

And there is a video in it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1474
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
455
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You will need to use a variety that produces its tubers under the mother plant. Most varieties don't do that.
 
gardener
Posts: 6066
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
929
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We grow sweets in trubs, we plant two plants per trub then add extra trubs with soil already in them for planting the leaf nodes from the vine so we can get a full winter's worth of sweet potatoes from as few as four to six plants.
If you trellis the vines you are missing out on many extra sweet potatoes since the vine doesn't touch the soil.

The first year we used totes for the sweet potatoes and simply covered the vine leaf nodes as they reached the ground, this method works well too.
The purpose of using totes or trubs is easy harvesting with no damage to the crop.

Redhawk
 
hans muster
Posts: 169
34
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for all the replies.

Su Ba, don't they produce a sweet potato at each node which is under the soil?

RedHawk, regarding trubs and totes (first time I see these words, nonnative english): You mean some kind of broad buckets, right? How deep and large do you have them?

My goal is to grow them on a balcony, and harvest the leaves. They taste really good! I need something not taking up too much space, but storing a lot of water.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6066
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
929
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hans, a trub is like a #2 washtub in size, about 40cm deep and around 80cm diameter. The totes I use are 22cm wide, 38cm long and 38cm deep. Just about any size can work, depending on how many slips (plants) you want per container.

You can even use 15cm clay pots (one plant per pot in that case). Leaf nodes on the vine will turn into extra plants if you put the node down into soil, I have a friend in NZ that has grown his sweet potatoes this way for years, he usually gets a bushel per plant by burying the leaf nodes as the vine grows. He leaves the growing tip exposed so the vine will continue to extend.

Tubers of sweet potatoes are very similar in growth patterns of regular potatoes, they are swollen areas of single roots so the more roots in the soil, the potential is there for more sweets to form.
In my area our growing season starts at the middle of April and continues through November, with our harvest coming in the first week of December, we harden them for three weeks then put them in storage in a root cellar, they last until we either run out or the new harvest is in the soil.

You could use the store bought, narrow balcony containers as long as they were deep enough.

Redhawk
 
Willie Smits can speak 40 languages. This tiny ad can speak only one:
September-October Homestead Skills Jamboree 2019
https://permies.com/wiki/118704/permaculture-projects/September-October-Homestead-Skills-Jamboree
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!