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Breadnut, Hualla Cubana and Guanacaste

 
Jeff Hodgins
Posts: 193
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Breadnut trees produces lots of fruits with a big nut inside. They can handle drought and heat that would kill a man, but can only be grown in hot places with no frost. A small part of the USA has no frost right? Dude if you live there this is the stuff to grow. Cows eat the leaves, it's used widly in Yucatan for cut and carry feeding.

Hualla same pit better fruit

Guanacaste already grows in Gorgia, Florida and Alabama. The pod is sweet and the pitts are great rosted of sprouted picked right off the ground after a few days of rain.The cool thing about it is that it casts very light shade for such a big tree. You can grow alot of stuff under there I personaly grow bamboo, coconuts, alovera, and taiwan gress under mine.

When you plant any of these seeds you cant just toss them out because animals eat them to. Don't be lazzy like I was, poke a hole in the dirt. Anyway I'll let ya'll know how broadcast seeding went.
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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This reference suggests that the breadfruit is also sensitive to humidity:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/breadfruit.html

Needing 1000+ mm of rain and the fact that it stops fruiting under cold or dry stress means its chances aren't too good in Mediterranean climates by my guess.

Their production of latex is an interesting bonus product, if you can grow them though.

What is the scientific name of the Hualla Cubana?  Google isn't giving me much.
 
Jeff Hodgins
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Breadnut (bromium alicastrum) not bread fruit.
 
Jeff Hodgins
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Ya I've tryed to google it as well. I have eaten the fruit and I'm growing the trees but I've only heard the name spoken. I tried varius spellings but no luck. Its eaither spanish of mayan language
 
Dave Boehnlein
Posts: 294
Location: Orcas Island, WA
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I prefer to refer to Brosmium alicastrum as "Mayan Breadnut" in English. That helps to distinguish it from the seeded form of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), which also happens to have excellent nuts (often referred to as "Breadnut" or "Castaña", but is by no means frost tolerant.

Dave
 
Jeff Hodgins
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Just to clarify I don't think that any of the three would tolorate much frost
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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I see you found the scientific name for the guaya cubana in the other thread - Melicoccus bijugatus.

This  ref says that it can take a little frost, but is too tender to fruit in California:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/mamoncillo.html#Climate
 
Jeff Hodgins
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Ya I found the name due to a link my friend sent me to a site called boni fied. they have a really cool place (in ecuador I think). 
 
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