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Plants got a disease or it's something else?

 
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Hey Guys,

I need you help! I am a beginner gardener and this year i noticed something alarming but can't spot the problem. I planted my tomatoes in March and in beginning of May some of them started to get yellow leaves, started wilting. They were all inside the house and only some of them got that problem. I planted some of the tomatoes  (they very and still are quite small, but I though they should just go out of the pots when I spotted the yellowness..), including the healthy ones, in the garden but it was still quite cold at night (denifitely below 10 degrees) but also that I didn't expect... The tomatoes are just getting worse and worse and I thought that it's the cold (in the house it's also cold, sometimesi it was 10 degrees C so they didn't grow very big) but now I doubt because today I noticed that some of the melde (Atriplex hortensis) started to have some yellow stains and looks really weird. wrinkled.

Could you help me with that? What can I do now? Is it a virus or maybe just cold weather? Melde is quite strong so I am worried that it's a disease and the weather is not the reason.

what do you think - could it be a curly top virus?

I attach photos. Please, please help!
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wilting and yellow...
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Hi Marta, welcome to Permies.

I think your first three photos look like symptoms of some kind of nutrient imbalance. It could be the cold, as phosphorous, for example, is less available for a plant in cold soil temps, or possibly it's symptoms of over fertilizing. The last two photos with the abnormal growth and curl look to me like possibly a pathogen infection or, exposure to some sort of herbicide. Both can cause funky tissue growth like that.
 
Marta Martecka
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James Freyr wrote:Hi Marta, welcome to Permies.

I think your first three photos look like symptoms of some kind of nutrient imbalance. It could be the cold, as phosphorous, for example, is less available for a plant in cold soil temps, or possibly it's symptoms of over fertilizing. The last two photos with the abnormal growth and curl look to me like possibly a pathogen infection or, exposure to some sort of herbicide. Both can cause funky tissue growth like that.



Hey James, thanks for response! I haven't been fertilizing the plants, they were planted in organic tomatoe earth and then tansplanted in the garden into a soil in the garden. We put some last old horse manure in February I think and after that nothing. I have heard that epsom salt could work for the phosphorous deficiency, would you try it on them?

The other plant (only the first photos are the tomatoes, the rest is "Melde" in German) got the yellow spots only last night... The only bug I see is the small red insects... like dots. We call them "fleas". And I haven't used any fertilizers or herbicides. It's such a strong plant, like a weed, so the cold should't be a problem for it.. should I remove the plants with the yellow marks to prevent a possible disease to spread?
 
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Epsom salts does not help with potassium or phosphorous it is magnesium sulfate.
What happens in the soil is the magnesium sulfate breaks into its component parts magnesium and sulfur this gently buffers the soil pH and feeds the microorganisms in the soil, which will then break down the minerals in the soil and make them available for the plants.
From your photos a quarter cup of Epsom salts spread around each plant that is in ground or if in a container use a table spoon per plant in that container, will help quite a bit with the issues.

If you have any multivitamins, take four tablets or capsules and dissolve in 1 gallon of water and use that at 1 quart per gallon dilution to water the plants, this will do wonders for their recovery since you will be adding P, K, and other trace minerals used by the microbiome organisms.
The vitamins will help condition the fungi that hopefully are around the root system as well as help the microorganisms.

(those red bugs are called mites and they will suck the life out of a plant, getting the plants healthy will probably cause the mites to move on)

Redhawk
 
Marta Martecka
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Epsom salts does not help with potassium or phosphorous it is magnesium sulfate.
What happens in the soil is the magnesium sulfate breaks into its component parts magnesium and sulfur this gently buffers the soil pH and feeds the microorganisms in the soil, which will then break down the minerals in the soil and make them available for the plants.
From your photos a quarter cup of Epsom salts spread around each plant that is in ground or if in a container use a table spoon per plant in that container, will help quite a bit with the issues.

If you have any multivitamins, take four tablets or capsules and dissolve in 1 gallon of water and use that at 1 quart per gallon dilution to water the plants, this will do wonders for their recovery since you will be adding P, K, and other trace minerals used by the microbiome organisms.
The vitamins will help condition the fungi that hopefully are around the root system as well as help the microorganisms.

(those red bugs are called mites and they will suck the life out of a plant, getting the plants healthy will probably cause the mites to move on)

Redhawk



Thanks Bryant! I will do that, I hope they will get better!
 
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