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Nitrogen fixing plants in a wicking container.

 
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Posts: 2483
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I am putting together some wicking containers.
Part of the design includes living willow branches growing in the water reservoir.
The idea is to give the food plants a constant feed of rooting hormone.
This made me wonder, if I plant a nitrogen fixer in a container that will have the roots extending into a shared reservoir, will the nitrogen be shared with other plants that wick from that water?
 
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Location: South Central Kansas
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William Bronson wrote: I am putting together some wicking containers.
Part of the design includes living willow branches growing in the water reservoir.
The idea is to give the food plants a constant feed of rooting hormone.
This made me wonder, if I plant a nitrogen fixer in a container that will have the roots extending into a shared reservoir, will the nitrogen be shared with other plants that wick from that water?



Some things I read is that nitrogen fixing plants only fix it the 2nd year. Others say you have to till or chop-n-drop them.

Why do you need so much rooting hormone??

Have you looked into[youtube] air layering[/youtube] yet?

I also read that raw or filtered (but not heated) honey is good for rooting plants. Have no idea how yet nor how much to use.


 
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