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rooting question

 
pollinator
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I have had cuttings of willows, maple and linden in cups and jars for many weeks now and of course the willows are rooting like crazy as well as sprouting new growth above the water line. However the maples and lindens showed new growth but there still are no roots developing on them. Is there anything I can do to get them to develop roots with this method? With all of the different cuttings mixed together the willows just took off and left the rest behind.
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linden with large new leaves
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no roots though
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gardener
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The maple and linden don't have the same chemical make up as willow trees have.
If you can get some willow branches, strip the bark (you want to be sure and get the cambium layer too) from those gathered, fresh branches and put some strips of the willow bark and cambium in each of the cups you currently have the Maples and Lindens in.
That should give them the rooting hormone they need to start producing roots, willow trees make their own rooting hormone so that if a branch touches the soil it will root and form a new tree, it is also why you can cut a willow branch, stick it in the ground and it will grow into a new tree.

Redhawk
 
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put fresh smooshed up Aloe Vera in the water, this also contains the rooting hormone needed.
 
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Just pouring some of the willow water into the other trees will also transfer some of the rooting hormone.

Willows are amazing.  
 
Aaron Tusmith
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Thanks for the input everyone, but the thing that had puzzled me is that initially the cuttings were all mixed together so that every container had at least one willow in it. I figured the presence of the willows would provide that needed hormone and help all of the cuttings form roots. However the maples and lindens just continue to form leaves -and now little branches but no roots. I will try some aloe though!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Aaron Tusmith wrote:Thanks for the input everyone, but the thing that had puzzled me is that initially the cuttings were all mixed together so that every container had at least one willow in it. I figured the presence of the willows would provide that needed hormone and help all of the cuttings form roots. However the maples and lindens just continue to form leaves -and now little branches but no roots. I will try some aloe though!



Having a willow branch in the same water is unfortunately not the same as having willow water.
When a willow branch is placed either in the ground or in a container or in just water, the enzymes that are responsible for forming roots are contained by the bark of the branch, so they only affect the wood they are touching.
When we make willow water, we are crushing the cambium which releases the enzymes into the water which then becomes a rooting compound (water+ willow enzymes), when we then place even hard to root plant stems in that water, the enzymes do their job and force roots to form.
When you are rooting branches this way it is a good idea to use a knife and cut several slits in the bark of the subject branch(s) before placing in the willow water, that way the enzymes can get to the subject plant endoderm and those cells will start producing root cells.

While Aloe works in a similar manner I tend to keep my aloe for burns and cuts for the most part. (I only have one aloe plant at this point)

Redhawk
 
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