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Urban Farming, City of San Francisco

 
Posts: 7
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forest garden urban cooking
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Hi everyone. I've been working on setting up a permaculture style food forest in my SF backyard in the Ingleside district. I started volunteering on urban farms in the city three years ago to gain experience and finally got my own space last year, a dusty dirt lot that had cars rusting on it for decades. Since then I put wood chips down, started a compost pile and sowed everything in April.

People warned me my area is too foggy and cold to grow much but I've been pleasantly surprised at what I've been able to get; kale, arugula, tree collards, radishes, squash, strawberries, all kinds of herbs, opuntia, potatoes, onions, carrots, celery, pepino dulce. I have a meyer lemon tree, kumquat tree and feijoa tree planted which so far have not produced.  I'm zone 10b so it never freezes but also never gets that hot.

I'd love to connect with other locals for advice and seed and plant exchange.
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pollinator
Posts: 845
Location: Southern Oregon
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I'm no longer in the bay area, but if you are interested in tomato varieties that work well in the area, for hybrids Early Girl, and San Francisco Fog work well. For heirloom, I've had very good luck with Stupice. Stupice is a small tomato, and ripens fairly quickly with minimal heat. I've also had very good luck saving seeds from it.

There are various permaculture groups in the area, like East Bay Permaculture, and there was an urban farming group meeting in SF. Good luck with your endeavors.
 
gardener
Posts: 1749
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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What stunning pictures!  Good for you -- may your tribe increase.
 
Posts: 90
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Stacy Witscher wrote:I'm no longer in the bay area, but if you are interested in tomato varieties that work well in the area, for hybrids Early Girl, and San Francisco Fog work well. For heirloom, I've had very good luck with Stupice. Stupice is a small tomato, and ripens fairly quickly with minimal heat. I've also had very good luck saving seeds from it.

There are various permaculture groups in the area, like East Bay Permaculture, and there was an urban farming group meeting in SF. Good luck with your endeavors.



Stacy, I could not find how I could Purple Moosage you directly so will 'backdoor' by replying to this post. I also grew up in the SF bay area, moved 'out' then further OUT ending up in northernmost CA. I have a feeling we aren't all that far apart and I would enjoy comparing 'notes' about seed varieties with you. I'm just a backyard gardener living on a rocky west facing hillside slowly learning which veggies will grow for us. Jain
 
Daniel Riera
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First squash of the season! These came from a volunteer seed from my worm bin so I'm not sure the variety. Maybe butternut? It's a big plant with a lot more buds on it.  Gonna grill them tonight!
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Posts: 15
Location: Oakland California
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Yo, would love to connect if you're still around. I'm across the bay in Oakland. Currently working in landscaping design and helping tons of friends do their gardens, would love to help with yours too. I also farm worms so if that's something you'd be interested in I can help and provide startup kit. Plant trade if nothing else! Blessings!

rio.forager@gmail.com
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