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Vegetable/Fruit varieties for short summer seasons

 
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I apologize in advance if this has already been posted and I am requesting help on something already discussed. I live in Goldendale, WA at 2,500' elevation and was looking for varieties of seeds that do well in short summer climates. Now, this is my first year here and perhaps I'm over-reacting but we probably had two days over 90 degrees this summer and most of our highs were in the low 80s, high 70s Fahrenheit. It was alarming. This kind of weather lasted for roughly 4 months. Regardless, I've done some research on here using galvanized steel and cinder block as heat sinks in garden beds and creating wind screens with trees that also serve to capture heat. That being said, I know there are varieties of seeds, for example, Blacktail Mountain Watermelon, that are supposed to succeed in short-season climates, maturing quickly. I was wondering if you guys had any recommendations of short-season varieties seeds for tomatoes, bell peppers, hot peppers, eggplants, bush beans, snap beans, corn, squash, etc. Anything really, including fruit trees! I have .25 acre devoted to this garden so this is a serious commitment. Thank you so much for you counsel.
 
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Over 90 here means it hits the newspapers, average summer high (july/August) is 69F, we also have 4 months frost free. So when looking for seeds you could try European varieties. What I find is that short season American types do not work, because although they are for a short summer, they are for a hot summer and that we can't do. You sound a bit warmer than me in summer so this next bit may not apply but here tomatoes peppers and egg plants are greenhouse only crops and watermelons don't happen (I have grown one in a greenhouse successfully but it needed months of babying in the house).
 
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For corn you didn't say what category of corn, but Magic Manna Flour Corn, and Ruby-Gold Cascade flint corn are both short-season corns.

Punta Banda is a fast-growing tomato, that also has the advantage of being both compact and indeterminate.

Tromboncino and Red Kuri squashes grow pretty fast.

If you can get hold of some of Carol Deppe's vegetable varieties, she bred them for short growing seasons, high productivity, and outstanding flavor. She hasn't been filling orders for the last 2 years, so if you decide to go that route I suggest ordering them from one of the other seed companies instead of directly from her. I'm personally very fond of her Beefy Resilient beans.
 
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